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Triglyceride to High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio is an Important Determinant of Cardiovascular Risk and Poor Prognosis in Coronavirus Disease-19: A Retrospective Case Series Study

Authors Zhang B, Dong C, Li S, Song X, Wei W, Liu L

Received 23 June 2020

Accepted for publication 26 August 2020

Published 23 October 2020 Volume 2020:13 Pages 3925—3936

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S268992

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Ming-Hui Zou


Benping Zhang,1,* Chen Dong,2,* Shengzhong Li,3 Xiaoqing Song,1 Wang Wei,4 Li Liu1

1Department of Endocrinology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pediatrics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Surgery, Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei 430023, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Gastroenterology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030, People’s Republic of China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Correspondence: Li Liu
Department of Endocrinology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430030, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86-027-83663470
Fax +86-027-83662883
Email liliu@tjh.tjmu.edu.cn

Background: Acute myocardial injury and heart failure characterized by elevated cardiac troponin and decreased heart pump function are significant clinical features and prognostic factors of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19). Triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio is an indicator of insulin resistance. This study aimed to explore the association of the TG/HDL-C ratio with cardiovascular risk and prognosis in COVID-19.
Methods: Ninety-eight laboratory-confirmed patients with COVID-19 admitted in a tertiary teaching hospital in Wuhan, China, were enrolled in this retrospective study. Regression models were used to investigate the association between TG/HDL-C ratio with myocardial injury, heart failure, severity, and mortality in COVID-19.
Results: Among the 98 patients, the mean age was 63.9± 1.4 years, and male sex (58, 59%) was predominant. Forty-six patients (47%) were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), 32 (33%) and 46 (47%) patients suffered from myocardial injury and heart failure, respectively, and 36 (37%) patients died. The TG/HDL-C ratio was increased in patients with myocardial injury, heart failure, severe illness, and fatal outcome (P< 0.05 for each). Baseline TG/HDL-C ratio significantly correlated with log transformed levels of plasma high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (r=0.251, P=0.018), N-terminal brain natriuretic propeptide (r=0.274, P=0.008), glycated hemoglobin (r=0.239, P=0.038), and interleukin-6 (r=0.218, P=0.042). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that an increased TG/HDL-C ratio was independently associated with the risk of myocardial injury [odds ratio (OR)=2.73; P=0.013], heart failure (OR=2.64; P=0.019), disease severity (OR=3.01; P=0.032), and fatal outcome (OR=2.97; P=0.014).
Conclusion: Increased TG/HDL-C ratio was independently associated with myocardial injury, heart failure, disease severity, and mortality in patients with COVID-19, and it may be a useful marker for early identification of patients with high risk and poor outcome.

Keywords: TG/HDL-C, insulin resistance, myocardial injury, heart failure, mortality, COVID-19

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