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Total pancreatectomy compared with pancreaticoduodenectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Authors Yang DJ, Xiong JJ, Liu XT, Li J, Dhanushka Layanthi Siriwardena KM, Hu WM

Received 23 November 2018

Accepted for publication 22 March 2019

Published 7 May 2019 Volume 2019:11 Pages 3899—3908

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S195726

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Andrew Yee

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Beicheng Sun


Du-Jiang Yang,1,* Jun-Jie Xiong,1,* Xue-Ting Liu,2 Jiao Li,3 Kanagarathna Mudiyanselage Dhanushka Layanthi Siriwardena,4 Wei-Ming Hu1

1Department of Pancreatic Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Emergency, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan Province, People’s Republic of China; 4West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan Province, People’s Republic of China
 
*These authors contributed equally to this work
 
 
Aim: To assess whether total pancreatectomy (TP) is as feasible, safe, and efficacious as pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD).
Materials and Methods: Major databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus and the Cochrane Library, were searched for studies comparing TP and PD between January 1943 and June 2018. The meta-analysis only included studies that were conducted after 2000. The primary outcomes were morbidity and mortality. Pooled odds ratios (ORs), weighted mean differences (WMDs) or hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 percent confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using fixed effects or random effects models. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated by the Risk of Bias in Non-randomized Studies of Interventions (ROBINS-I) tool.
Results: In total, 45 studies were included in this systematic review, and 5 non-randomized comparative studies with 786 patients (TP: 270, PD: 516) were included in the meta-analysis. There were no differences in terms of mortality (OR: 1.44, 95% CI: 0.66–3.16; P=0.36), hospital stay (WMD: −0.60, 95% CI: −1.78–0.59; P=0.32) and rates of reoperation (OR: 1.12; 95% CI: 0.55–2.31; P=0.75) between the two groups. In addition, morbidity was not significantly different between the two groups (OR: 1.41, 95% CI: 1.01–1.97; P=0.05); however, the results showed that the TP group tended to have more complications than the PD group. Furthermore, the operation time (WMD: 29.56, 95% CI: 8.23–50.89; P=0.007) was longer in the TP group. Blood loss (WMD: 339.96, 95% CI: 117.74–562.18; P=0.003) and blood transfusion (OR: 4.86, 95% CI: 1.93–12.29; P=0.0008) were more common in the TP group than in the PD group. There were no differences in the long-term survival rates between the two groups.
Conclusion: This systematic review and meta-analysis suggested that TP may not be as feasible and safe as PD. However, TP and PD may have the same efficacy.

Keywords: total pancreatectomy, pancreaticoduodenectomy, morbidity, mortality, meta-analysis

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