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Simulation experiences of paramedic students: a cross-cultural examination

Authors Williams B, Abel C, Khasawneh E, Ross L, Levett-Jones T

Received 16 October 2015

Accepted for publication 30 January 2016

Published 21 March 2016 Volume 2016:7 Pages 181—186

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S98462

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Shakila Srikumar

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Anwarul Azim Majumder


Brett Williams,1 Chloe Abel,1 Eihab Khasawneh,2 Linda Ross,1 Tracy Levett-Jones3

1Department of Community Emergency Health & Paramedic Practice, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; 2Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia

Background: Simulation-based education is an important part of paramedic education and ­training. While accessing clinical placements that are adequate in quality and quantity continues to be challenging, simulation is being recognized by paramedic academics as a potential alternative. Examining students’ satisfaction of simulation, particularly cross-culturally is therefore important in providing feedback to academic teaching staff and the international paramedic community.
Objective: This study aimed to compare simulation satisfaction among paramedic students from universities in Australia and Jordan.
Methods: A cross-sectional study using a paper-based English version of the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience Scale was administered to paramedic students from all year levels.
Results: A total of 511 students participated in this study; 306 students (60%) from Australia (Monash University) and 205 students (40%) from Jordan (Jordan University of Science and Technology). There were statistically significant differences with large effect size noted in all three original factors between Australian and Jordanian students: debrief and feedback (mean =38.66 vs mean =34.15; P<0.001; d=0.86), clinical reasoning (mean =21.32 vs mean =18.28; P<0.001; d=0.90), and clinical learning (mean =17.59 vs mean =15.47; P<0.001; d=1.12).
Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that simulation education is generally well received by students in Australia and Jordan although Australian students reported having higher satisfaction levels then their Jordanian counterparts. These results provide important data for paramedic educators involved in simulation-based education and training in Australia and Jordan and pave the way for other cross-cultural examinations to be explored.

Keywords: allied health worker, culture, paramedics, simulation, undergraduate, student, education

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