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Severe lamotrigine toxicosis in a dog

Authors Sawyer D, Gates K

Received 4 January 2017

Accepted for publication 26 January 2017

Published 18 April 2017 Volume 2017:8 Pages 27—30

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/VMRR.S131583

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Lucy Goodman

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Young Lyoo


Video abstract presented by Danielle Sawyer

Views: 268

Danielle Sawyer, Kathryn Gates

Emergency and Critical Care Department, Advanced Critical Care and Emergency Specialty Services, Culver City, CA, USA

Objective: The objective of this study was to describe a case of severe lamotrigine toxicosis in a dog, which was successfully treated using minimal medical interventions.
Case summary: A 7-month-old male, intact, Labrador mix was evaluated because of acute onset of vomiting, rigidity, and dull mentation after ingesting lamotrigine tablets. The estimated oral dose that had been ingested was 278 mg/kg (611.6 mg/lb). Physical examination was unremarkable other than abnormalities noted in the cardiovascular and neurological systems. Neurological examination revealed dull mentation, vertical nystagmus, four-legged extensor limb rigidity, and alligator rolling. Cardiovascular examination revealed pale pink mucous membranes and multifocal ventricular tachycardia. Intravenous (IV) fluids were started at three times maintenance (180 mL/kg/day). Methocarbamol (100 mg/kg [220 mg/lb], rectally) and lidocaine (2 mg/kg [4.4 mg/lb, IV]) were administered. Twenty-four and seventy-two hours after presentation, the dog was clinically normal with no ventricular tachycardia being noted.
Conclusion:
Lamotrigine (6-[2,3-dichlorophenyl]-1,2,4-triazine-3,5-diamine) is an anticonvulsant medication used in humans, which inhibits voltage-gated sodium channels. The clinical success of this case suggests that administration of only methocarbamol for the neurologic effects and lidocaine for the arrhythmias, as well as supportive IV fluid therapy, could be a successful treatment strategy for dogs, even with severe lamotrigine toxicosis.

Keywords: arrhythmia, toxicity, multifocal ventricular tachycardia, poison

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