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Scenario-based teaching in undergraduate medical education

Authors Patel K, El Tokhy O

Received 7 November 2016

Accepted for publication 19 November 2016

Published 22 December 2016 Volume 2017:8 Pages 9—10

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S126922

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Editor who approved publication: Dr Anwarul Azim Majumder


Kunj Patel, Omar El Tokhy

Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK

We read with great interest the study by Frost et al1 which highlights the importance of scenario-based teaching (SBT) of clinical communication in medical undergraduate pediatrics teaching. SBT involves students navigating a storyline based around a complex problem, running in parallel with case-based learning. We were impressed by the results of the SBT program at Cardiff University School of Medicine. As medical students currently on our pediatric rotation at Imperial College London, we have experienced at first hand the benefits of SBT. Throughout the placement, it continues to help us tackle the complexities which arise when communicating with children and their families. We have noted its particular benefit in breaking bad news to families. Without effective teaching on this particular scenario, a failure to grasp this skill could exacerbate patient and parent concerns. Much like the authors of this study highlight,1 we believe specific teaching on communication skills should be a mandatory part of medical undergraduate education at every institution. Imperial College School of Medicine has developed a similar teaching style which has been unparalleled in its benefit to us during our pediatric rotation. Although there is scant literature available specifically addressing communicating with children and parents at undergraduate level, the use of SBT throughout undergraduate medical teaching should not be underestimated. 

Read the original paper by Frost et al

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