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Potential Role of Musashi-2 RNA-Binding Protein in Cancer EMT

Authors Sun J, Sheng W, Ma Y, Dong M

Received 21 December 2020

Accepted for publication 22 February 2021

Published 17 March 2021 Volume 2021:14 Pages 1969—1980

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OTT.S298438

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr William Cho


Jian Sun, Weiwei Sheng, Yuteng Ma, Ming Dong

Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The First Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, 110001, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Ming Dong
Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The First Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, 110001, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86-83282881
Fax +86-024-83282886
Email [email protected]

Abstract: Local invasion and distant metastasis are the key hallmarks in the aggressive progression of malignant tumors, including the ability of cancer cells to detach from the extracellular matrix overcome apoptosis, and disseminate into distant sites. It is generally believed that this malignant behavior is stimulated by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Musashi (MSI) RNA-binding proteins, belonging to the evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding proteins (RBP) family, were originally discovered to regulate asymmetric cell division during embryonic development. Recently, Musashi-2 (MSI2), as a key member of MSI family, has been prevalently reported to be tightly associated with the advanced clinical stage of several cancers. Multiple oncogenic signaling pathways mediated by MSI2 play vital roles in EMT. Here, we systematically reviewed the detailed role and signal networks of MSI2 in regulating cancer development, especially in EMT signal transduction, involving EGF, TGF-β, Notch, and Wnt pathways.

Keywords: Musashi-2, EMT, EGF, TGF-β, notch, Wnt, targeted therapy

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