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No Association Between ADIPOQ or MTHFR Polymorphisms and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in South African Women

Authors Dias S, Adam S, Rheeder P, Pheiffer C

Received 27 November 2020

Accepted for publication 16 January 2021

Published 24 February 2021 Volume 2021:14 Pages 791—800

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S294328

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Konstantinos Tziomalos


Stephanie Dias,1,2 Sumaiya Adam,2 Paul Rheeder,3 Carmen Pheiffer1,4

1Biomedical Research and Innovation Platform (BRIP), South African Medical Research Council, Cape Town, 7505, South Africa; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa; 4Division of Medical Physiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, 7505, South Africa

Correspondence: Carmen Pheiffer
Biomedical Research and Innovation Platform (BRIP), South African Medical Research Council, Tygerberg, 7505, South Africa
Tel +27 21 938 0292
Email carmen.pheiffer@mrc.ac.za

Purpose: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a growing public health concern. GDM affects approximately 14% of pregnancies globally, and without effective treatment, is associated with short- and long-term complications in mother and child. Lower serum adiponectin (ADIPOQ) concentrations and aberrant DNA methylation have been reported during GDM. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the ADIPOQ − 11377C>G and − 11391G>A, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C>T polymorphisms and GDM in a population of black South African women.
Materials and Methods: DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood of 447 pregnant women with (n=116) or without (n=331) GDM, where after ADIPOQ (rs266729 and rs17300539) and MTHFR (rs1801133) polymorphisms were genotyped using TaqMan Quantitative Real-Time PCR analysis.
Results: Women with GDM had a higher body mass index (p=0.012), were more insulin resistant (p< 0.001) and had lower adiponectin levels (p=0.013) compared to pregnant women with normoglycemia. Genotypic, dominant and recessive genetic models showed no association between ADIPOQ rs266729 and rs17300539 and MTHFR rs1801133 polymorphisms and GDM. Intriguingly, the risk G allele of ADIPOQ rs266729 was associated with higher fasting glucose and insulin concentrations, while the T allele in MTHFR rs1801133 was associated with higher fasting insulin concentrations only.
Conclusion: ADIPOQ rs266729 and rs17300539 and MTHFR rs1801133 polymorphisms are not associated with GDM in a population of black South African women. These findings suggest that these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) do not individually increase GDM risk in the African population. However, the role of these SNPs in possible gene-gene or gene-environment interactions remain to be established.

Keywords: SNP genotyping, molecular biomarkers, adiponectin, ADIPOQ, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, MTHFR, gestational diabetes mellitus, GDM

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