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Improvement in Clinical Symptoms and Fecal Microbiome After Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in a Dog with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Authors Niina A, Kibe R, Suzuki R, Yuchi Y, Teshima T, Matsumoto H, Kataoka Y, Koyama H

Received 12 September 2019

Accepted for publication 18 November 2019

Published 2 December 2019 Volume 2019:10 Pages 197—201

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/VMRR.S230862

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Nicola Ludin

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Young Lyoo


Ayaka Niina,1 Ryoko Kibe,2 Ryohei Suzuki,1 Yunosuke Yuchi,1 Takahiro Teshima,1 Hirotaka Matsumoto,1 Yasushi Kataoka,2 Hidekazu Koyama1

1Laboratory of Veterinary Internal Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, Musashino, Tokyo, Japan; 2Laboratory of Veterinary Microbiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, Musashino, Tokyo, Japan

Correspondence: Ayaka Niina
Laboratory of Veterinary Internal Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, 1-7-1 Kyonan-Cho, Musashino-Shi, Tokyo 180-8602, Japan
Tel +81 422 31 4151
Fax +81 422 31 4560
Email a.niina2173@gmail.com

Purpose: Recently, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been tested in veterinary medicine as a treatment option for multiple gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, there are no reports of changes in the microbial diversity of fecal microbiome after treatment with FMT in canine IBD cases. Moreover, little is known about the long-term efficacy and safety of FMT treatment for dogs. Herein, we present a case of canine intractable IBD treated with repeated, long-term FMT.
Patients and methods: The patient was a 10-year-old, neutered, male, 4-kg Toy Poodle with a prolonged history of vomiting and diarrhea. Fecal examination for pathogens was negative. Despite treatment with multiple antibacterial and antidiarrheal agents, the patient showed no improvement. Endoscopic mucus sampling diagnosed a case of lymphocytic-plasmacytic duodenitis, ie, idiopathic IBD. Eventually, we performed periodic, long-term fecal microbiota transplantation of fresh donor feces collected from a 4-year-old, 32.8-kg, neutered male Golden Retriever by rectal enema. Additionally, we performed 16S rRNA sequence analysis, before and after FMT, to evaluate the microbiome diversity.
Results: Fecal microbiome diversity after FMT resembled that of the healthy donor dog’s fecal microbiome, before FMT, which led us to conclude that the fecal microbiome in our patient normalized with FMT. Moreover, the clinical symptoms improved remarkably with regard to the changes in the fecal microbiome. Additionally, we noted no observable side effects during FMT treatment.
Conclusion: This report indicates the efficacy and safety of long-term, periodic FMT for a case of canine IBD based on attenuation of clinical symptoms and changes in fecal microbiome diversity. Therefore, FMT could be chosen as a treatment option for IBD in canines in the future.

Keywords: fecal microbiota transplantation, inflammatory bowel disease, canine, dysbiosis, microbiome, diversity

Creative Commons License This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License. The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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