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Hypertension and blood pressure variability management practices among physicians in Singapore

Authors Setia S, Subramaniam K, Tay JC, Teo BW

Received 4 April 2017

Accepted for publication 11 June 2017

Published 17 July 2017 Volume 2017:13 Pages 275—285

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S138694

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Prof. Dr. Amudha Kadirvelu


Sajita Setia,1 Kannan Subramaniam,2 Jam Chin Tay,3 Boon Wee Teo4

1Chief Medical Office, Medical Affairs, Pfizer Pte Ltd, Singapore; 2Global Medical Affairs, Asia Pacific Region, Pfizer Australia, West Ryde, NSW, Australia; 3Department of General Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 4Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore

Purpose: There are limited data on blood pressure variability (BPV) in Singapore. The absence of updated local guidelines might contribute to variations in diagnosis, treatment and control of hypertension and BPV between physicians. This study evaluated BPV awareness, hypertension management and associated training needs in physicians from Singapore.
Materials and methods: Physicians from Singapore were surveyed between September 8, 2016, and October 5, 2016. Those included were in public or private practice for ≥3 years, cared directly for patients ≥70% of the time and treated ≥30 patients for hypertension each month. The questionnaire covered 6 main categories: general blood pressure (BP) management, BPV awareness/diagnosis, home BP monitoring (HBPM), ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM), BPV management and associated training needs.
Results: Responses from 60 physicians (30 general practitioners [GPs], 20 cardiologists, 10 nephrologists) were analyzed (77% male, 85% aged 31–60 years, mean 22 years of practice). Approximately 63% of physicians considered white-coat hypertension as part of BPV. The most common diagnostic tool was HBPM (overall 77%, GPs 63%, cardiologists 65%, nephrologists 70%), but ABPM was rated as the tool most valued by physicians (80% overall), especially specialists (97%). Withdrawn Singapore guidelines were still being used by 73% of GPs. Approximately 48% of physicians surveyed did not adhere to the BP cutoff recommended by most guidelines for diagnosing hypertension using HBPM (>135/85 mmHg). Hypertension treatment practices also varied from available guideline recommendations, although physicians did tend to use a lower BP target for patients with diabetes or kidney disease. There were a number of challenges to estimating BPV, the most common of which was patient refusal of ABPM/HBPM. The majority of physicians (82%) had no training on BPV, but stated that this would be useful.
Conclusion: There appear to be gaps in knowledge and guideline adherence relating to the assessment and management of BPV among physicians in Singapore.

Keywords: hypertension, blood pressure, guidelines, antihypertensives, blood pressure variability, blood pressure monitoring
 

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