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Evaluation of the orthopedic residency training program in Saudi Arabia and comparison with a selected Canadian residency program

Authors Al-Ahaideb A, Alrabai H, Alrehaili O, Aljurayyan A, Alsaif R, Algarni N, Al-Khawashki H, Algarni A

Received 11 June 2014

Accepted for publication 18 July 2014

Published 19 September 2014 Volume 2014:5 Pages 315—321

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S69217

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3


Abdulaziz Al-Ahaideb,1 Hamza M Alrabai,1 Osama A Alrehaili,1 Abdulaziz N Aljurayyan,1 Ranyah M Alsaif,2 Nizar Algarni,1 Hazem M Al-Khawashki,1 Abdulrahman D Algarni1

1Department of Orthopedics, 2Department of Physiotherapy, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Objective: The primary aim of the present study was to assess the quality of the Saudi Orthopedic Residency Program.
Methodology: As a comparator, a cross-sectional survey involving 76 Saudi residents from different training centers in Saudi Arabia namely; Riyadh, Jeddah, Medina, Abha, and Dammam and 15 Canadian.
Results: The results showed that Canadian residents read more peer-reviewed, scholarly articles compared with Saudi residents (P=0.002). The primary surgical role for residents was to hold retractors during surgery. The survey respondents strongly supported the ability to recommend removal of incompetent trainers. Saudi trainees were more apprehensive of examinations than Canadian trainees (P<0.0001). Most residents preferred studying multiple-choice questions before examinations. Saudi and Canadian participants considered their programs to be overcrowded. Unlike Canadian participants, Saudi trainees reported an inadequate level of training (P<0.0001).
Conclusion: Educational resources should be readily accessible and a mentorship system monitoring residents' progress should be developed. The role of the resident must be clearly defined and resident feedback should not be ignored. Given the importance of mastering basic orthopedic operative skills for residents, meaningful remedial action should be taken with incompetent trainers.

Keywords: evaluation, medical education, orthopedic board, residency program, training

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