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Cardiovascular risk profile, oxygen uptake, and perceived exertion rate in children with obesity: the interactive effect of exercise intensity and duration

Authors Elnaggar RK, Elshazly FA, Abdelbasset WK, Ahmed AS

Received 10 December 2018

Accepted for publication 11 February 2019

Published 17 April 2019 Volume 2019:12 Pages 527—536

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S197642

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Konstantinos Tziomalos


Ragab K Elnaggar,1,2 Fathy A Elshazly,1,2 Walid K Abdelbasset,2,3 Ahmed S Ahmed2,4

1Department of Physical Therapy for Pediatrics, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 2Department of Physical Therapy and Health Rehabilitation, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Physical Therapy, Kasr Al-Aini Hospital, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 4Department of Physical Therapy for Cardiovascular, Respiratory Disorders, and Geriatrics, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt

Background: Although physical exercise is a crucial element in the management of childhood obesity, the most effective training intensity and duration remain controversial. The primary purpose of this study was to analyze the interaction effects of exercise intensity and duration on cardiovascular risk profile, maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) in obese children.
Methods: Eighty obese children were allocated evenly to four groups (20 in each group): groups I and II performed 20 -minute and 40-minute constant-load treadmill training, respectively, with the intensity set at running speed, corresponding to 100% of first ventilatory threshold (VT1), and groups III and IV performed 20 -minute and 40-minute training, respectively, with the intensity set at running speed, corresponding to 80% of VT1. Training was conducted every other day for eight consecutive weeks. Blood lipids, VO2max, and RPE were assessed pre- and postintervention.
Results: Postintervention, significant between-group differences regarding all outcome measures (P<0.05) were indicated. Total cholesterol level had dropped significantly in group II compared to the other groups (adjusted P<0.05), and low-density lipoprotein and triglycerides had decreased significantly in group II compared to group III (adjusted P=0.003 and 0.007, respectively). VO2max had increased significantly in group II compared to group I (adjusted P=0.008). RPE had decreased significantly in group II in comparison to other groups (adjusted P<0.05).
Conclusion: Intensity and duration are essential factors in aerobic-exercise prescription to reduce cardiovascular risk factors, increase oxygen uptake, and improve perceived exertion in obese children.

Keywords: childhood obesity, aerobic exercises, cholesterol, lipoproteins, oxygen consumption, effort perception

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