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The relationship of psychosocial factors to mammograms, physical activity, and fruit and vegetable consumption among sisters of breast cancer patients

Authors Hartman S, Dunsiger, Jacobsen P

Published 11 August 2011 Volume 2011:3 Pages 257—263

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJWH.S23246

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4


Sheri J Hartman1, Shira I Dunsiger1, Paul B Jacobsen2
1Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine, The Miriam Hospital and W Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI; 2Department of Health Outcomes and Behavior, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA

Abstract: This study examined the relationship of psychosocial factors to health-promoting behaviors in sisters of breast cancer patients. One hundred and twenty sisters of breast cancer patients completed questionnaires assessing response efficacy of mammography screenings, physical activity, and fruit and vegetable consumption on decreasing breast cancer risk, breast cancer worry, involvement in their sister’s cancer care, mammography screenings, physical activity, and fruit and vegetable consumption. Results indicate that greater perceived effectiveness for mammograms was associated with a 67% increase in odds of yearly mammograms. Greater involvement in the patient’s care was associated with a 7% decrease in odds of yearly mammograms. Greater perceived effectiveness for physical activity was significantly related to greater physical activity. There was a trend for greater perceived effectiveness for fruits and vegetables to be associated with consuming more fruits and vegetables. Breast cancer worry was not significantly associated with the outcomes. While perceived effectiveness for a specific health behavior in reducing breast cancer risk was consistently related to engaging in that health behavior, women reported significantly lower perceived effectiveness for physical activity and fruits and vegetables than for mammograms. Making women aware of the health benefits of these behaviors may be important in promoting changes.

Keywords: breast cancer risk, mammograms, physical activity, diet, perceived effectiveness

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