Back to Journals » Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy » Volume 12

The relationship between serum-free insulin-like growth factor-1 and metabolic syndrome in school adolescents of northeast China

Authors Xie S, Jiang R, Xu W, Chen Y, Tang L, Li L, Li P

Received 22 November 2018

Accepted for publication 30 January 2019

Published 5 March 2019 Volume 2019:12 Pages 305—313

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S195625

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Ming-Hui Zou


Shuang Xie,1,2 Ranhua Jiang,3 Wanfeng Xu,4 Yu Chen,4 Lei Tang,1 Ling Li,1 Ping Li4

1Department of Endocrinology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, P.R. China; 2Department of General Medicine (VIP ward), Cancer Hospital of China Medical University, Liaoning Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, P.R. China; 3Department of Endocrinology, Liaoyang Diabetes Hospital, Liaoyang, Liaoning Province, P.R. China; 4Department of Endocrinology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, P.R. China

Purpose: Free insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) ratio (the ratio of IGF-1/insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 [IGFBP-3]) was shown to be negatively correlated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) in adults, but it was unknown in Chinese adolescents.
Patients and methods: The cross-sectional study enrolled 701 healthy school students (aged 12–16 years, 46.1% females) and 93 of them (18–22 years old, 46.2% females) were followed after 5 years.
Results: In the cross-sectional study, the IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratios were found correlated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C; r= -0.071, P<0.05) and diastolic blood pressure (r= -0.077, P=0.034). A lower IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratio was an independent risk factor for MetS (OR =2.348, 95% CI: 1.040–5.303), hypertension (OR=1.729, 95% CI: 1.040–5.303), and increased LDL-C (OR=1.841, 95% CI: 1.230–2.755). In the follow-up study, all the participants were >18 years old. We found a lower baseline ratio of IGF-1/IGFBP-3 in adolescence was an independent risk factor for MetS in adulthood (OR=10.724, 95% CI: 1.032–11.403) and also indicated a higher body mass index (β=-1.361, 95% CI: -2.513 to -0.208) after 5 years.
Conclusion: The lower IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratio was an independent risk factor for MetS, hypertension, and high LDL-C in adolescents of northeast China and was also a predictive marker for MetS and increased body mass index in the adulthood.

Keywords: IGF-1, IGFBP-3, adolescent, metabolic syndrome

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]