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The relationship between hypertriglyceridemic-waist phenotype and vitamin D status in type 2 diabetes

Authors Ma CM, Yin FZ

Received 3 February 2019

Accepted for publication 6 March 2019

Published 23 April 2019 Volume 2019:12 Pages 537—543

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S204062

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Ms Justinn Cochran

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Juei-Tang Cheng


Chun-Ming Ma, Fu-Zai Yin

Department of Endocrinology, The First Hospital of Qinhuangdao, Qinhuangdao 066000, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China

Background: The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between hypertriglyceridemic-waist (HTW) phenotype and vitamin D status in type 2 diabetes.
Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in subjects with type 2 diabetes. This study enrolled 338 type 2 diabetic (190 males and 148 females). The HTW phenotype was defined as serum triglyceride concentrations ≥1.7 mmol/L and waist circumference ≥90 cm (male) and 85 cm (female). Multiple logistic regression models were used for modeling relationships between HTW phenotype and vitamin D status.
Results: The prevalence of HTW phenotype was 36.4%. The prevalence of HTW phenotype was 10.5%, 27.2%, and 41.6% in type 2 diabetes with vitamin D sufficiency, vitamin D insufficiency, and vitamin D deficiency, respectively. In multiple logistic regression analysis, subjects with vitamin D deficiency were more likely to have HTW phenotype (OR=6.222, 95%CI: 1.307–29.620, P=0.022) compared with subjects with vitamin D sufficiency.
Conclusions: There was a significant correlation between HTW phenotype and vitamin D status in type 2 diabetes.

Keywords: hypertriglyceridemic-waist phenotype, vitamin D status, type 2 diabetes

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