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The fluctuating incidence, improved survival of patients with breast cancer, and disparities by age, race, and socioeconomic status by decade, 1981–2010

Authors Lu G, Li J, Wang S, Pu J, Sun H, Wei Z, Ma Y, Wang J, Ma H

Received 9 May 2018

Accepted for publication 20 August 2018

Published 30 October 2018 Volume 2018:10 Pages 4899—4914

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S173099

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 4

Editor who approved publication: Professor Lu-Zhe Sun


Guanming Lu,1,* Jie Li,2,* Shuncong Wang,3,* Jian Pu,1 Huanhuan Sun,3 Zhongheng Wei,4 Yanfei Ma,1 Jun Wang,5 Haiqing Ma3

1Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Youjiang Medical University for Nationalities, Baise, Guangxi 533000, China; 2Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080, China; 3Department of Oncology, The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai, Guangdong 519000, China; 4Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Youjiang Medical University for Nationalities, Baise, Guangxi 533000, China; 5Department of Oncology, General Hospital, Jinan Command of People’s Liberation Army, Jinan, Shandong 250000, China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Purpose: Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women worldwide. However, the data on breast cancer incidence and survival over a long period, especially the dynamic changes in the role of race and socioeconomic status (SES), are scant.
Materials and methods: To evaluate treatment outcomes of patients with breast cancer over the past 3 decades, the data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries were used to assess the survival of patients with breast cancer. Period analysis was used to analyze the incidence and survival trend; survival was evaluated by the relative survival rates (RSRs) and Kaplan–Meier analyses. The HRs for age, race, stage, and SES were assessed by Cox regression.
Results: A total of 433,366 patients diagnosed with breast cancer between 1981 and 2010 were identified from the original nine SEER registries. The incidences of breast cancer in each decade were 107.1 per 100,000, 117.5 per 100,000, and 109.8 per 100,000. The 10-year RSRs improved each decade, from 70.8% to 81.5% to 85.6% (P<0.0001). The lower survival in black race and high-poverty group is confirmed by Kaplan–Meier analyses and RSRs. Furthermore, Cox regression analyses demonstrated that age, race, SES, and stage are independent risk factors for patients with breast cancer in each decade.
Conclusion: The current data demonstrated a fluctuating incidence trend with improving survival rates of patients with breast cancer over the past 3 decades. In addition, the survival disparity exists among different races, ages, SESs, and stages.

Keywords:
breast cancer, incidence, relative survival rates, race and socioeconomic status

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