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Strategies to optimize treatment adherence in adolescent patients with cystic fibrosis

Authors Bishay LC, Sawicki GS

Received 13 July 2016

Accepted for publication 15 September 2016

Published 21 October 2016 Volume 2016:7 Pages 117—124

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/AHMT.S95637

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Akshita Wason

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Alastair Sutcliffe

Lara C Bishay, Gregory S Sawicki

Division of Respiratory Diseases, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

Abstract: While development of new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to a significant improvement in survival age, routine daily treatment for CF is complex, burdensome, and time intensive. Adolescence is a period of decline in pulmonary function in CF, and is also a time when adherence to prescribed treatment plans for CF tends to decrease. Challenges to adherence in adolescents with CF include decreased parental involvement, time management and significant treatment burden, and adolescent perceptions of the necessity and value of the treatments prescribed. Studies of interventions to improve adherence are limited and focus on education, without significant evidence of success. Smaller studies on behavioral techniques do not focus on adolescents. Other challenges for improving adherence in adolescents with CF include infection control practices limiting in-person interactions. This review focuses on the existing evidence base on adherence intervention in adolescents with CF. Future directions for efforts to optimize treatment adherence in adolescents with CF include reducing treatment burden, developing patient-driven technology to improve tracking, communication, and online support, and rethinking the CF health services model to include assessment of individualized adherence barriers.

Keywords: compliance, adolescence, medication, self management, intervention

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