Back to Journals » International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease » Volume 15

Sarcopenia Is an Independent Risk Factor for NAFLD in COPD: A Nationwide Survey (KNHANES 2008–2011)

Authors Hong KS, Kim MC, Ahn JH

Received 12 February 2020

Accepted for publication 20 April 2020

Published 7 May 2020 Volume 2020:15 Pages 1005—1014

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S249534

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Richard Russell


Kyung Soo Hong,1 Min Cheol Kim,2 June Hong Ahn1

1Division of Pulmonary and Allergy, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University and Regional Center for Respiratory Diseases, Yeungnam University Medical Center, Daegu, South Korea; 2Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yeungnam University Medical Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu, South Korea

Correspondence: June Hong Ahn
Division of Pulmonary and Allergy, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University and Regional Center for Respiratory Diseases, Yeungnam University Medical Center, 170 Hyeonchung-ro, Nam-gu, Daegu 42415, South Korea
Email fireajh@gmail.com

Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is highly prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is independently associated with cardiometabolic comorbidities and systemic inflammation. Although several factors are associated with NAFLD, the influence of sarcopenia on NAFLD has not been fully determined in patients with COPD. We explored whether sarcopenia is associated with NAFLD in a COPD population.
Methods: Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2008– 2011 were analyzed. The subjects were defined as having NAFLD when they had a hepatic steatosis index (HSI) score > 36, which is a previously validated NAFLD prediction score. Sarcopenia_BMI (=total appendicular skeletal muscle mass [kg]/body mass index [kg/m2]), sarcopenia_BW (=total appendicular skeletal muscle mass [kg]/body weight [kg] × 100), and sarcopenia_height (= total appendicular skeletal muscle mass (kg)/height2 (m)) measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to diagnose sarcopenia.
Results: NAFLD was identified in 124 (14.6%) of 850 COPD subjects using the HSI. Multivariable logistic analyses adjusted for age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), forced vital capacity (FVC), and metabolic syndrome demonstrated that sarcopenia (sarcopenia_BMI, odds ratio [OR] = 1.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11– 3.46, p = 0.022; sarcopenia_BW, OR = 2.25; 95% CI, 1.30– 3.92, p = 0.004) was associated with NAFLD in patients with COPD. The proportion of sarcopenia_BMI was higher in patients with a high fibrotic burden from NAFLD (Q3, Q4) than in subjects with a low fibrotic burden from NALFD (Q1, Q2) (54.8% vs 24.2%, p = 0.024). The proportion of sarcopenia_BW was also higher in patients with a high fibrotic burden from NAFLD than in patients with a low fibrotic burden from NAFLD (51.6% vs 30.6%, p = 0.029).
Conclusion: Sarcopenia was associated with an increased risk for NAFLD in patients with COPD, independent of age, sex, lung function, and metabolic factors. Sarcopenic COPD was also associated with a high fibrotic burden in NAFLD patients. Pulmonologists should be aware of possible liver comorbidities in the sarcopenic COPD phenotype.

Keywords: COPD, sarcopenia, NAFLD

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]