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Role of Melatonin in the Regulation of Pain

Authors Xie S, Fan W, He H, Huang F

Received 24 August 2019

Accepted for publication 20 January 2020

Published 7 February 2020 Volume 2020:13 Pages 331—343

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S228577

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 4

Editor who approved publication: Dr Michael Schatman


Shanshan Xie,1,2 Wenguo Fan,2,3 Hongwen He,2,4 Fang Huang1,2

1Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Anesthesiology, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Oral Anatomy and Physiology, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Fang Huang; Hongwen He
Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan Road 2, Guangzhou 510080, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86 20 87330570
Fax +86 20 87330709
Email hfang@mail.sysu.edu.cn; 497642565@qq.com

Abstract: Melatonin is a pleiotropic hormone synthesized and secreted mainly by the pineal gland in vertebrates. Melatonin is an endogenous regulator of circadian and seasonal rhythms. Melatonin is involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes demonstrating antioxidant, antineoplastic, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory properties. Accumulating evidence has revealed that melatonin plays an important role in pain modulation through multiple mechanisms. In this review, we examine recent evidence for melatonin on pain regulation in various animal models and patients with pain syndromes, and the potential cellular mechanisms.

Keywords: melatonin, pain, cellular mechanisms

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