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Relationship of negative and positive core beliefs about the self with dysfunctional attitudes in three aspects of life

Authors Otani K, Suzuki A, Matsumoto Y, Shirata T

Received 31 August 2017

Accepted for publication 26 September 2017

Published 12 October 2017 Volume 2017:13 Pages 2585—2588

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S150537

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Prof. Dr. Roumen Kirov

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Taro Kishi


Koichi Otani, Akihito Suzuki, Yoshihiko Matsumoto, Toshinori Shirata

Department of Psychiatry, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, Japan



Objective: Cognitive theory assumes a pivotal role of negative core beliefs about the self in dysfunctional attitudes predisposing to depression. Meanwhile, the role of positive core beliefs about the self in cognitive vulnerability to depression is unknown. Therefore, we examined the relationship of negative and positive core beliefs about the self with dysfunctional attitudes in three aspects of life.
Methods: The subjects were 311 Japanese volunteers. Core beliefs of negative-self and positive-self were evaluated by the corresponding subscales of the Brief Core Schema Scales. Dysfunctional attitudes in the areas of achievement, dependency and self-control were measured by the corresponding subscales of the 24-item Dysfunctional Attitude Scale.
Results: The negative-self subscale was correlated with the achievement, dependency and self-control subscales. The positive-self subscale was correlated with the achievement and self-control subscales.
Conclusion: The present study suggests that negative core beliefs about the self underlie all types of dysfunctional attitudes, while positive core beliefs about the self have some connections with dysfunctional attitudes related to achievement and self-control.

Keywords: negative-self, achievement, dependency, self-control, depression

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