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Progress in Clinical Research on Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Antagonists for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

Authors Liu YF, Fu SQ, Yan YC, Gong BB, Xie WJ, Yang XR, Sun T, Ma M

Received 11 November 2020

Accepted for publication 20 January 2021

Published 16 February 2021 Volume 2021:15 Pages 639—649

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DDDT.S291369

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Anastasios Lymperopoulos


Yi-Fu Liu, Sheng-Qiang Fu, Yu-Chang Yan, Bin-Bin Gong, Wen-Jie Xie, Xiao-Rong Yang, Ting Sun, Ming Ma

Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, 330000, Jiangxi Province, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Ming Ma
Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, 330000, Jiangxi Province, People’s Republic of China
Email mm15070835359@163.com

Abstract: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor agonists are still the most commonly used androgen deprivation treatment (ADT) drugs for prostate cancer in clinical practice. Currently, the GnRH receptor antagonists used for endocrine therapy for prostate cancer primarily include degarelix and relugolix (TAK-385). The former is administered by subcutaneous injection, while the latter is an oral drug. Compared to GnRH agonists, GnRH antagonists reduce serum testosterone levels more rapidly without an initial testosterone surge or subsequent microsurges. This review focuses on the mechanism of action of GnRH antagonists and agonists, the developmental history of GnRH antagonists, and emerging data from clinical studies of the two antagonists used as endocrine therapy for prostate cancer.

Keywords: gonadotropin-releasing hormone, prostate cancer, degarelix, relugolix

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