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Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: improving outcomes for mother and child

Authors González I, Lecube A, Rubio MÁ, García-Luna PP

Received 22 August 2016

Accepted for publication 8 November 2016

Published 14 December 2016 Volume 2016:8 Pages 721—729

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJWH.S99970

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Elie Al-Chaer


Irene González,1 Albert Lecube,2 Miguel Ángel Rubio,3 Pedro Pablo García-Luna4

1Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Huelva, Huelva, Spain; 2Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Arnau de Vilanova University Hospital, Lleida Biomedicine Research Institute (IRB-Lleida), CIBER in Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Disorders (CIBERDEM), Lleida University, Lleida, Spain; 3Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, IDISSC, Madrid, Spain; 4Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocío, Seville, Spain

Abstract:
The significant increase in the prevalence of obesity has led to an increase in the number of obese women who become pregnant. In this setting, in recent years, there has been an exponential rise in the number of bariatric procedures, with approximately half of them performed in women of childbearing age, and a remarkable surge in the number of women who become pregnant after having undergone bariatric surgery (BS). These procedures entail the risk of nutritional deficiencies, and nutrition is a crucial aspect during pregnancy. Therefore, knowledge and awareness of the consequences of these techniques on maternal and fetal outcomes is essential. Current evidence suggests a better overall obstetric outcome after BS, in comparison to morbid obese women managed conservatively, with a reduction in the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus, pregnancy-associated hypertensive disorders, macrosomia, and congenital defects. However, the risk of potential maternal nutritional deficiencies and newborns small for gestational age cannot be overlooked. Results concerning the incidence of preterm delivery and the number of C-sections are less consistent. In this paper, we review the updated evidence regarding the impact of BS on pregnancy.

Keywords: bariatric surgery, pregnancy, maternal and fetal outcomes, gestational diabetes mellitus, small for gestational age

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