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Plasma cholinesterase is associated with Chinese adolescent overweight or obesity and metabolic syndrome prediction

Authors Han Y, Ma Y, Liu Y, Zhao Z, Zhen S, Yang X, Xu Z, Wen D

Received 15 January 2019

Accepted for publication 16 April 2019

Published 14 May 2019 Volume 2019:12 Pages 685—702

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S201594

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Ms Justinn Cochran

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Antonio Brunetti


Yanshuo Han,1,2 Yanan Ma,1,3 Yang Liu,1 Zhongyi Zhao,1 Shihan Zhen,1 Xuelian Yang,1 Zhiyong Xu,4 Deliang Wen1

1Institute of Health Science, China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of General Surgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China; 3Public Health Department, China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China; 4Educational Research Centre of Huanggu District, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China

Purpose: To determine the plasma concentrations of butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), also known as pseudocholinesterase, in different weight categories of adolescents, and to explore the possible association between plasma BChE and overweight (OW), obesity, and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Chinese adolescents.
Patients and methods: This cross-sectional study included 1,236 Chinese adolescents (194 obese [OB], 188 OW, 732 normal weight [NW], and 122 underweight [UW]). The biochemical variables and anthropometric variables of the study participants were evaluated. Plasma BChE level was measured by DGKC method.
Results: OB was associated with a higher prevalence of upper strata plasma BChE levels when compared with the BChE levels in UW, NW, and OW group. A logistic regression analysis showed that plasma BChE was positively associated with the OB group when compared with the NW group. Boys in the OW group, but not the OB group, had a significantly higher prevalence of upper stratum of BChE levels. Plasma triglyceride, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and ApoB levels were positively associated with the upper stratum of BChE levels when compared with lower stratum. MetS and most of its components were more prevalent among subjects with upper stratum rather than lower stratum BChE levels. Receiver operating characteristic curves for plasma BChE in subjects with MetS indicated that the AUC was 0.80 (95%CI:0.70–0.90,P<0.001) and 0.89 (95%CI:0.82–0.95,P<0.001) in girls and boys, respectively. After adjusting for age, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratio for MetS in the upper stratum of BChE levels was 8.73 (95%CI: 3.49–21.84) in the boys cohorts and also in the girls cohorts (OR=1.71, 95%CI: 1.35–21.70).
Conclusion: This study confirmed an association between BChE levels and weight status in Chinese adolescents, and demonstrated that the upper strata of plasma BChE levels were associated with being OW, and even more highly associated with obesity. Plasma BChE levels were positively associated with MetS and its components and could be useful for identifying adolescents with MetS.

Keywords: butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), adolescents obesity, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia

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