Back to Browse Journals » Advances in Medical Education and Practice » Volume 4

Planning for interprofessional change in primary health care: exploring the use of the Interprofessional Resource Centre

Authors Patterson C, Arthur H, Peachey G, Vohra J, Price D, Pearson D, Mariani R

Received 30 January 2013

Accepted for publication 27 March 2013

Published 14 May 2013 Volume 2013:4 Pages 117—125

DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S43462

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 5

Christine Patterson,1 Heather Arthur,1,2 Gladys Peachey,1 Julie Vohra,1 David Price,3 Dave Pearson,4 Rob Mariani5

1School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 2Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario/Michael G DeGroote Endowed Chair in Cardiovascular Nursing Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 3Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 4Central West Local Health Integration Network, Brampton, ON, Canada; 5Ascentum Consulting, Ottawa, ON, Canada

Importance: Resources to support change are needed for solo practitioners who are transitioning to family health teams (FHTs) which involve multiple health disciplines working together to provide team-based care.
Objective: The purpose of this project was: (1) to explore the use of an online resource, the Interprofessional Resource Centre (IRC), when planning for interprofessional change and; (2) to explore the experience of planning interprofessional change.
Design and setting: Six FHTs organized under the structure of one Local Health Integrated Network (LHIN) in Ontario, Canada.
Intervention: Participants in six FHTs were directed to the IRC to support planning interprofessional change. In addition, two of the six FHTs participated in pilot site meetings with investigators where they received in-person support to apply the information from the IRC to an interprofessional activity.
Results: Pilot site participants reported the IRC was useful for planning, but they cited lack of time to use it as a key barrier. When planning for interprofessional change, providers experienced challenges with physician buy-in and team dynamics. As a strategy for change, providers would like to learn from other FHTs who have experienced success with interprofessional change; at the LHIN level, they saw a need for more educational opportunities. Participation was found to be low among those only receiving online support.
Conclusion and relevance: Based on the results of the study, it appears that online resource centers do have some value in knowledge translation when combined with in-person meetings. In exploring the planning of interprofessional change in primary health care teams, it was found that buy-in with physicians is a key challenge.

Keywords: online, knowledge transfer, family health teams, team-based care, supporting change, buy-in

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF] View Full Text [HTML] 

 

Other article by this author:

Interprofessional Resource Centre: a knowledge translation strategy

Christine Patterson, Julie Vohra, David Price, et al

Advances in Medical Education and Practice 2011, 2:35-41

Published Date: 19 January 2011

Readers of this article also read:

Emerging and future therapies for hemophilia

Carr ME, Tortella BJ

Journal of Blood Medicine 2015, 6:245-255

Published Date: 3 September 2015

A new recombinant factor VIII: from genetics to clinical use

Santagostino E

Drug Design, Development and Therapy 2014, 8:2507-2515

Published Date: 12 December 2014

Patient preference and ease of use for different coagulation factor VIII reconstitution device scenarios: a cross-sectional survey in five European countries

Cimino E, Linari S, Malerba M, Halimeh S, Biondo F, Westfeld M

Patient Preference and Adherence 2014, 8:1713-1720

Published Date: 12 December 2014

Methacrylic-based nanogels for the pH-sensitive delivery of 5-Fluorouracil in the colon

Ashwanikumar N, Kumar NA, Nair SA, Kumar GS

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2012, 7:5769-5779

Published Date: 15 November 2012

Cross-linked acrylic hydrogel for the controlled delivery of hydrophobic drugs in cancer therapy

Deepa G, Thulasidasan AK, Anto RJ, Pillai JJ, Kumar GS

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2012, 7:4077-4088

Published Date: 27 July 2012

Particle size reduction to the nanometer range: a promising approach to improve buccal absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs

Rao S, Song Y, Peddie F, Evans AM

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2011, 6:1245-1251

Published Date: 20 June 2011

The use of PEGylated liposomes in the development of drug delivery applications for the treatment of hemophilia

Rivka Yatuv, Micah Robinson, Inbal Dayan-Tarshish, et al

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2010, 5:581-591

Published Date: 6 August 2010