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Peptidomimetics as a new generation of antimicrobial agents: current progress

Authors Méndez-Samperio P

Received 7 May 2014

Accepted for publication 17 June 2014

Published 30 August 2014 Volume 2014:7 Pages 229—237

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S49229

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 6

Patricia Méndez-Samperio

Department of Immunology, National School of Biological Sciences, National Polytechnic Institute, Mexico City, Mexico

Abstract: Antibiotic resistance is an increasing public health concern around the world. Rapid increase in the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has been the target of extensive research efforts to develop a novel class of antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small cationic amphiphilic peptides, which play an important role in the defense against bacterial infections through disruption of their membranes. They have been regarded as a potential source of future antibiotics, owing to a remarkable set of advantageous properties such as broad-spectrum activity, and they do not readily induce drug-resistance. However, AMPs have some intrinsic drawbacks, such as susceptibility to enzymatic degradation, toxicity, and high production cost. Currently, a new class of AMPs termed "peptidomimetics" have been developed, which can mimic the bactericidal mechanism of AMPs, while being stable to enzymatic degradation and displaying potent activity against multidrug-resistant bacteria. This review will focus on current findings of antimicrobial peptidomimetics. The potential future directions in the development of more potent analogs of peptidomimetics as a new generation of antimicrobial agents are also presented.

Keywords: drug resistance, infection, antimicrobial peptides

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