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Partial hepatectomy induces delayed hepatocyte proliferation and normal liver regeneration in ovariectomized mice

Authors Umeda M, Hiramoto M, Imai T

Received 2 January 2015

Accepted for publication 3 April 2015

Published 2 July 2015 Volume 2015:8 Pages 175—182

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CEG.S80212

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Professor Andreas M Kaiser


Makoto Umeda,1 Masaki Hiramoto,1,2 Takeshi Imai1
 
1Department of Aging Intervention, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi, Japan; 2Department of Biochemistry, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan
 
Abstract: Estrogens play central roles in sexual development, reproduction, and hepatocyte proliferation. The ovaries are one of the main organs for estradiol (E2) production. Ovariectomies (OVXs) were performed on the female mice, and hepatocyte proliferation was analyzed. The ovariectomized mice exhibited delayed hepatocyte proliferation after partial hepatectomy (PH) and also exhibited delayed and reduced E2 induction. Both E2 administration and PH induced the gene expression of estrogen receptor α (ERα). The transcripts of ERα were detected specifically in periportal hepatocytes after E2 administration and PH. Moreover, the E2 concentrations and hepatocyte proliferation rates were highest in the proestrus period of the estrous cycle. Taken together, these findings indicate that E2 accelerated ERα expression in periportal hepatocytes and hepatocyte proliferation in the female mice.

Keywords: estrogen, ER, estrous cycle, hepatocyte proliferation, liver regeneration


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