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No Differences in the Prevalence and Intensity of Chronic Postsurgical Pain Between Laparoscopic Hysterectomy and Abdominal Hysterectomy: A Prospective Study

Authors Jin J, Min S, Peng L, Du X, Zhang D, Ren L

Received 29 July 2019

Accepted for publication 24 December 2019

Published 7 January 2020 Volume 2020:13 Pages 1—9

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S225230

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Michael A Überall


Juying Jin, Su Min, Lihua Peng, Xunsong Du, Dong Zhang, Li Ren

Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Juying Jin
Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, 1 Youyi Road, Chongqing 400016, People’s Republic of China
Email juyingjin@hotmail.com

Objective: To compare the prevalence and characteristics of chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) between laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH) and abdominal hysterectomy (AH) groups 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery, and to assess the impact of pain on the activities of daily living (ADL) of patients.
Methods: The demographic characteristics, intraoperative clinical factors, and postoperative pain score were collected prospectively in patients scheduled for elective LH or AH for benign disease at our institution from July 2014 to June 2015. Patients were interviewed by telephone and followed up for pain assessment 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. The prevalence, intensity, and specific locations of pain, as well as analgesic administration and impact on the ADL, were included in the questionnaire.
Results: The results from 406 patients (225 patients in the LH group and 181 patients in the AH group) were obtained. Three months after surgery, the prevalence of CPSP was 20.9% in the LH group and 20.4% in the AH group. At 6 months, the prevalence of pain declined to 11.6% in the LH group and 9.4% in the AH group. At 12 months after surgery, only 13 (5.8%) patients in the LH group and 11 (6.1%) patients in the AH group complained about persistent pain. The prevalence of CPSP, as well as the average numerical rating scale pain scores at rest and during movement, during 12 months after surgery were not significantly different between the groups. CPSP after hysterectomy exhibited a negative impact on the ADL.
Conclusion: The prevalence and intensity of CPSP were not significantly different between patients undergoing LH or AH within 12 months after surgery. A tendency towards a reduction in chronic pain over time was documented. Chronic post-hysterectomy pain exhibited a negative impact on the ADL.

Keywords: chronic post-surgical pain, laparoscopic hysterectomy, abdominal hysterectomy

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