Back to Journals » Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment » Volume 17

Low-Protein, Hypocaloric Nutrition with Glutamine versus Full-Feeding in the Acute Phase in ICU Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

Authors Xiong W, Qian K

Received 8 December 2020

Accepted for publication 8 February 2021

Published 2 March 2021 Volume 2021:17 Pages 703—710

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S296296

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Yuping Ning


Weichuan Xiong,1,2 KeJian Qian2

1Department of Critical Care Medicine, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, 330006, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Critical Care Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, 330006, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: KeJian Qian Email [email protected]

Objective: To investigate the 28-day mortality, the length of ICU stay, days in the hospital, days of ventilator use, adverse events, and nosocomial infection events of low-protein, hypocaloric nutrition with glutamine in the first 7 days of the intensive care unit (ICU) patients with severe traumatic brain injury (STBI).
Patients and Methods: A total of 53 patients diagnosed with STBI enrolled from the third affiliated hospital of Nanchang University (Nanchang, China), from January 2019 to July 2020, were divided into two groups. We performed a randomized prospective controlled trial. The intervention group (n=27) was nutritional supported (intestinal or parenteral) with a caloric capacity of 20– 40% of European Conference on Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) recommendations; specifically, low-protein intake was 0.5– 0.7g/kg per day (containing the amount of alanyl-glutamine), glutamine was 0.3 g/kg per day, and the intervention treatment lasted for 7 days. The control group (n=26) was nutritionally supported with a caloric capacity of 70– 100% of ESPEN recommendations, and the protein intake was 1.2– 1.7 g/kg per day. The primary endpoint was 28-day mortality. Secondary endpoints were the length of ICU stay, days in the hospital, days of ventilator use, adverse events and nosocomial infection events.
Results: There were no differences in baseline characteristics between groups. Survival curve analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method revealed no significant difference in 28-day mortality between the two groups (P=0.31) while adverse events (χ2= 5.853, P=0.016), nosocomial infection rate (χ2 = 4.316, P=0.038), the length of ICU stay (t=− 2.617, P=0.012), hospitalization time (t=− 2.169, P=0.036), and days of ventilator use (t=− 2.144,P=0.037) of patients in the intervention group were significantly lower than those in the control group.
Conclusion: Low-protein, hypocaloric nutrition with glutamine did not show different outcomes in 28-day mortality compared to full-feeding nutritional support in the ICU patients with STBI. However, low-protein, hypocaloric nutrition with glutamine could provide a lower need for ICU time, hospitalization time, and ventilator time in the ICU patients with STBI.

Keywords: acute phase, severe traumatic brain injury, nutrition, low-protein, hypocaloric, glutamine

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]