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Knowledge of pregnant women on mother-to-child transmission of HIV, its prevention, and associated factors in Assosa town, Northwest Ethiopia

Authors Abtew S, Awoke W, Asrat A

Received 11 November 2015

Accepted for publication 23 February 2016

Published 5 May 2016 Volume 2016:8 Pages 101—107

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/HIV.S100301

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Lucy Goodman

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Bassel Sawaya


Solomon Abtew, Worku Awoke, Anemaw Asrat

College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia

Introduction: HIV/AIDS is a leading cause of death of children in sub-Saharan African countries. Almost all HIV-positive children acquire infection through mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV. Successful intervention toward prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and achieving the goal of eliminating the new HIV infection is highly dependent on everyone; especially, women of child-bearing age should have accurate and up-to-date knowledge about HIV transmission, risk of transmission to babies, and possible interventions. However, knowledge of MTCT of HIV, its prevention, and associated factors among women was not well studied in Benshangul Gumuz Region (Ethiopia).
Methods: A facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted involving 398 pregnant women who attended antenatal care services at governmental health institutions from February to March 2014 in Assosa town. Based on the flow of antenatal care attendants, the calculated sample size was proportionally allocated to the health facilities before data collection. Following this, systematic sampling method was used, and data were collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was done using SPSS version 20 statistical packages.
Result: A total of 386 pregnant women participated with a response rate of 97%, and 222 (57.5%) of them had full knowledge about the three critical modes of HIV transmission from mother to child, but only 67 (17.4%) knew the possible prevention methods. Knowledge on MTCT of HIV was positively associated with women who had sufficient knowledge on HIV/AIDS (adjusted odd ratio [AOR] =2.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.54–5.32), women who had a favorable attitude to provider-initiated HIV counseling and testing (AOR =2.19, 95% CI =1.22–3.92), and women who did not expect any partner's reaction to positive HIV test result after testing (AOR =1.58, 95% CI =1.01–2.49). Correspondingly, knowledge on PMTCT of HIV was positively associated with women who had sufficient knowledge on HIV/AIDS (AOR =2.64, 95% CI =1.24–5.65), women who had favorable attitude toward provider's counseling and testing (AOR =4.27, 95% CI =1.95–9.34), and women who did not expect any partner's reaction to positive HIV test result after testing (AOR =3.56, 95% CI =1.58–8.01).
Conclusion: Knowledge on MTCT and its prevention among women is low in the study area. We recommend more efforts to be exerted on improving women's knowledge of PMTCT of HIV.

Keywords: pregnant women, mother-to-child transmission and prevention, Assosa

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