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Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Towards COVID-19 Among Chronic Disease Patients at Addis Zemen Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

Authors Akalu Y, Ayelign B, Molla MD

Received 22 April 2020

Accepted for publication 11 June 2020

Published 24 June 2020 Volume 2020:13 Pages 1949—1960

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S258736

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 6

Editor who approved publication: Professor Suresh Antony


Yonas Akalu,1 Birhanu Ayelign,2 Meseret Derbew Molla3

1Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia; 2Department of Immunology and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical and Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia; 3Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia

Correspondence: Yonas Akalu
Department of Human Physiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, P.O. Box 196, Gondar, Ethiopia
, Tel +251 918318230
Email yonasakalu21@gmail.com

Purpose: The recent outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is the worst global crisis after the Second World War. Since no successful treatment and vaccine have been reported, efforts to enhance the knowledge, attitudes, and practice of the public, especially the high-risk groups, are critical to manage COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, this study aimed to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice towards COVID-19 among patients with chronic disease.
Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 404 chronic disease patients from March 02 to April 10, 2020, at Addis Zemen Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Both bivariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses with a 95% confidence interval were fitted to identify factors associated with poor knowledge and practice towards COVID-19. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) was used to determine the magnitude of the association between the outcome and independent variables. P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.
Results: The mean age of the participants was 56.5± 13.5. The prevalence of poor knowledge and poor practice was 33.9% and 47.3%, respectively. Forty-one percent of the participants perceived that avoiding of attending a crowded population is very difficult. Age (AOR=1.05, (95% CI (1.01– 1.08)), educational status of “can’t read and write” (AOR=7.1, 95% CI (1.58– 31.93)), rural residence (AOR=19.0, 95% CI (6.87– 52.66)) and monthly income (AOR=0.8, 95% CI (0.79– 0.89)) were significantly associated with poor knowledge. Being unmarried (AOR=3.9, 95% CI (1.47– 10.58)), cannot read and write (AOR=2.7, 95% CI (1.03– 7.29)), can read and write (AOR=3.5, 95% CI (1.48– 8.38)), rural residence (AOR=2.7, 95% CI (1.09– 6.70)), income of < 7252 Ethiopian birr (AOR=2.3, 95% CI (1.20– 4.15)) and poor knowledge (AOR=8.6, 95% CI (3.81– 19.45)) were significantly associated with poor practice.
Conclusion: The prevalence of poor knowledge and poor practice was high. Leaflets prepared in local languages should be administered and health professionals should provide detailed information about COVID-19 to their patients.

Keywords: COVID-19, chronic disease patients, attitude, knowledge, practice, Ethiopia

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