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In vitro stress effect on degradation and drug release behaviors of basic fibroblast growth factor – poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid) microsphere

Authors Xiong Y, Yu Z, Lang Y, Hu J, Li H, Yan Y, Tu C, Yang T, Song Y, Duan H, Pei F

Received 1 August 2015

Accepted for publication 30 September 2015

Published 25 January 2016 Volume 2016:10 Pages 431—440

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DDDT.S93554

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Rekha Dhanwani

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Wei Duan

Yan Xiong,1 Zeping Yu,1 Yun Lang,1 Juanyu Hu,1 Hong Li,2 Yonggang Yan,2 Chongqi Tu,1 Tianfu Yang,1 Yueming Song,1 Hong Duan,1 Fuxing Pei1

1Department of Orthopedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 2Laboratory of Biomechanical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China

Objective: To study the degradation and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) release activity of bFGF – poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid) microsphere (bFGF-PLGA MS) under stress in vitro, including the static pressure and shearing force-simulating mechanical environment of the joint cavity.
Method: First, bFGF-PLGA MSs were created. Meanwhile, two self-made experimental instruments (static pressure and shearing force loading instruments) were initially explored to provide stress-simulating mechanical environment of the joint cavity. Then, bFGF-PLGA MSs were loaded into the two instruments respectively, to study microsphere degradation and drug release experiments. In the static pressure loading experiment, normal atmospheric pressure loading (approximately 0.1 MPa), 0.35 MPa, and 4.0 MPa pressure loading and shaking flask oscillation groups were designed to study bFGF-PLGA MS degradation and bFGF release. In the shearing force loading experiment, a pulsating pump was used to give the experimental group an output of 1,000 mL/min and the control group an output of 10 mL/min to carry out bFGF-PLGA MS degradation and drug release experiments. Changes of bFGF-PLGA MSs, including microsphere morphology, quality, weight-average molecular weight of polymer, and microsphere degradation and bFGF release, were analyzed respectively.
Results: In the static pressure loading experiment, bFGF-PLGA MSs at different pressure were stable initially. The trend of molecular weight change, quality loss, and bFGF release was consistent. Meanwhile, microsphere degradation and bFGF release rates in the 4.0 MPa pressure loading group were faster than those in the normal and 0.35 MPa pressure loading groups. It was the fastest in the shaking flask group, showing a statistically significant difference (P<0.0001). In the shearing force loading experiment, there were no distinctive differences in the rates of microsphere degradation and bFGF release between experimental and control group. Meanwhile, microsphere degradation and bFGF release rates by shaking flask oscillation were obviously faster than those by shearing force only (P<0.0001).
Conclusion:
There are significant effects on bFGF-PLGA MS degradation and bFGF release due to the interaction between extraction stress and time. Static pressure has a conspicuous influence on bFGF-PLGA MS degradation and release, especially at a pressure of 4.0 MPa. The shearing force has a slight effect on bFGF-PLGA MS degradation and drug release. On the contrary, shaking flask oscillation has a significantly distinctive effect.

Keywords: microsphere, basic fibroblast growth factor, bFGF, poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid), PLGA, stress, drug release
 

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