Back to Browse Journals » Advances in Medical Education and Practice » Volume 4

Human factors perspective on the prescribing behavior of recent medical graduates: implications for educators

Authors Gordon M, Catchpole K, Baker P

Received 19 November 2012

Accepted for publication 11 December 2012

Published 10 January 2013 Volume 2013:4 Pages 1—9

DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S40487

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Morris Gordon,1,2 Ken Catchpole,3 Paul Baker1,4

1Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of Salford, Salford, UK; 2Department of Paediatrics, Fairfield General Hospital, Bury, UK; 3Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4North Western Deanery, Manchester, UK

Background: Junior doctors are at high risk of involvement in medication errors. Educational interventions to enhance human factors and specifically nontechnical skills in health care are increasingly reported, but there is no work in the context of prescribing improvement to guide such education. We set out to determine the elements that influence prescribing from a human factors perspective by recent medical graduates and use this to guide education in this area.
Methods: A total of 206 recent medical graduates of the North Western Foundation School were asked to describe their views on safety practices and behaviors. Free text data regarding prescribing behaviors were collected 1, 2, and 4 months after starting their posts. A 94.1% response rate was achieved. Qualitative analysis of data was completed using the constant comparison method. Five initial categories were developed, and the researchers subsequently developed thematic indices according to their understanding of the emerging content of the data. Further data were collected through group interviews 8–9 months into the placement to ensure thematic saturation.
Results: Six themes were established at the axial coding level, ie, contributors to inappropriate prescribing, contributors to appropriate prescribing, professional responsibility, prescribing error, current practices, and methods for improvement of prescribing. Utilizing appropriate theoretical elements, we describe how recent medical graduates employ situational and error awareness to guide risk assessment.
Conclusion: We have modeled the human factors of prescribing behavior by recent medical graduates. As these factors are related to a number of recognized elements of nontechnical skills training within health care, educators should consider design elements from such existing interventions to support prescribing improvement programs. Future research should seek to assess the effectiveness of prescribing focused nontechnical skills training.

Keywords: medication error, patient safety, nontechnical skills

A Letter to the Editor has been received and published for this article.

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF] View Full Text [HTML] 

 

Readers of this article also read:

Patient preference and ease of use for different coagulation factor VIII reconstitution device scenarios: a cross-sectional survey in five European countries

Cimino E, Linari S, Malerba M, Halimeh S, Biondo F, Westfeld M

Patient Preference and Adherence 2014, 8:1713-1720

Published Date: 12 December 2014

Using portable negative pressure wound therapy devices in the home care setting

Burke JR, Morley R, Khanbhai M

Smart Homecare Technology and TeleHealth 2014, 2:129-135

Published Date: 9 December 2014

Second case report of successful electroconvulsive therapy for a patient with schizophrenia and severe hemophilia A

Saito N, Shioda K, Nisijima K, Kobayashi T, Kato S

Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 2014, 10:865-867

Published Date: 16 May 2014

Managing hemophilia: the role of mobile technology

Khair K, Holland M

Smart Homecare Technology and TeleHealth 2014, 2:39-44

Published Date: 6 May 2014

Near-infrared spectroscopy and plasma homovanillic acid levels in bipolar disorder: a case report

Miura I, Kono S, Oshima S, Kanno-Nozaki K, Mashiko H, Niwa SI, Yabe H

Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 2014, 10:507-511

Published Date: 25 March 2014

A novel platinum chromium everolimus-eluting stent for the treatment of coronary artery disease

Bennett J, Dubois C

Biologics: Targets and Therapy 2013, 7:149-159

Published Date: 19 June 2013

Tivozanib in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma

Hepgur M, Sadeghi S, Dorff TB, Quinn DI

Biologics: Targets and Therapy 2013, 7:139-148

Published Date: 11 June 2013

Factors correlated with improvement of endothelial dysfunction during rituximab therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

Benucci M, Saviola G, Manfredi M, Sarzi-Puttini P, Atzeni F

Biologics: Targets and Therapy 2013, 7:69-75

Published Date: 15 March 2013

Cross-linked acrylic hydrogel for the controlled delivery of hydrophobic drugs in cancer therapy

Deepa G, Thulasidasan AK, Anto RJ, Pillai JJ, Kumar GS

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2012, 7:4077-4088

Published Date: 27 July 2012