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Frequency of heterozygous TET2 deletions in myeloproliferative neoplasms

Authors Tripodi J, Hoffman R, Najfeld V, Weinberg R

Published 17 September 2010 Volume 2010:2 Pages 219—223

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S12829

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2


Joseph Tripodi1, Ronald Hoffman1, Vesna Najfeld2, Rona Weinberg3
1The Myeloproliferative Disorders Program, Tisch Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine and 2Department of Medicine and Pathology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 3The Myeloproliferative Disorders Program, Cellular Therapy Laboratory, The New York Blood Center, New York, NY, USA

Abstract: The Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and primary myelofibrosis, are a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders with overlapping clinical and cytogenetic features and a variable tendency to evolve into acute leukemia. These diseases not only share overlapping chromosomal abnormalities but also a number of acquired somatic mutations. Recently, mutations in a putative tumor suppressor gene, ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) on chromosome 4q24 have been identified in 12% of patients with MPN. Additionally 4q24 chromosomal rearrangements in MPN, including TET2 deletions, have also been observed using conventional cytogenetics. The goal of this study was to investigate the frequency of genomic TET2 rearrangements in MPN using fluorescence in situ hybridization as a more sensitive method for screening and identifying genomic deletions. Among 146 MPN patients, we identified two patients (1.4%) who showed a common 4q24 deletion, including TET2. Our observations also indicated that the frequency of TET2 deletion is increased in patients with an abnormal karyotype (5%).

Keywords: TET2, myeloproliferative neoplasms, fluorescence in situ hybridization, cytogenetics

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