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Exercise counseling of primary care physicians in metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases is associated with their specialty and exercise habits

Authors Morishita Y, Miki A, Okada M, Tsuboi S, Ishibashi K, Ando Y, Nagata D, Kusano E

Received 13 March 2014

Accepted for publication 29 April 2014

Published 17 June 2014 Volume 2014:7 Pages 277—283

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S64031

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Yoshiyuki Morishita,1 Atushi Miki,1 Mari Okada,1 Satoshi Tsuboi,2 Kenichi Ishibashi,3 Yasuhiro Ando,1 Daisuke Nagata,1 Eiji Kusano4

1Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan; 2Department of Public Health, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan; 3Department of Medical Physiology, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo, Japan; 4Utsunomiya Social Insurance Hospital, Tochigi, Japan

Background: We investigated the practice of exercise counseling of primary care physicians in metabolic syndromes and cardiovascular diseases and its association with their age class, specialty, work place, and their own exercise habits.
Subjects and methods: The subjects were 3,310 medical doctors who had graduated from Jichi Medical University in Japan. The study instrument was a self-administered questionnaire to investigate their age class, specialty, workplace, exercise habits, and exercise counseling for their patients.
Results: Overall, 839 completed responses were analyzed from a total of 933 that were received (28.2%). The primary care physicians whose specialties were internal medicine and general medicine significantly more often recommended exercise in diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, heart failure, and hypertension cases than those whose specialties were surgery and pediatrics. The primary care physicians whose specialty was pediatrics recommended exercise less often in apoplexia cases than those whose specialties were internal medicine, general medicine, and surgery. Their exercise habits were positively associated with their recommendation of exercise in hyperlipidemia, heart failure, and hypertension cases; however, these associations were not observed in diabetes mellitus and apoplexia. The primary care physicians' age class and work place showed no association with their exercise recommendations in metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases.
Conclusion: The primary care physicians whose specialties were internal medicine and general medicine significantly more often recommended exercise in diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, heart failure, and hypertension cases. In addition, their own exercise habits were positively associated with their recommendation of exercise in hyperlipidemia, heart failure, and hypertension cases.

Keywords: primary care physician, self-administered questionnaire, exercise recommendation, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases

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