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Evaluating an undergraduate interprofessional simulation-based educational module: communication, teamwork, and confidence performing cardiac resuscitation skills

Authors Luctkar-Flude M, Baker, Pulling CA, McGraw R, Dagnone JD, Medves J, Turner-Kelly C

Published 8 November 2010 Volume 2010:1 Pages 59—66

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S14100

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 3


Marian Luctkar-Flude1, Cynthia Baker1, Cheryl Pulling1, Robert McGraw2, Damon Dagnone2, Jennifer Medves1, Carly Turner-Kelly1
1School of Nursing, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada; 2School of Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Purpose: Interprofessional (IP) collaboration during cardiac resuscitation is essential and contributes to patient wellbeing. The purpose of this study is to evaluate an innovative simulation-based IP educational module for undergraduate nursing and medical students on cardiac resuscitation skills.
Methods: Nursing and medical trainees participated in a new cardiac resuscitation curriculum involving a 2-hour IP foundational cardiac resuscitation skills lab, followed by three 2-hour IP simulation sessions. Control group participants attended the existing two 2-hour IP simulation sessions. Study respondents (N = 71) completed a survey regarding their confidence performing cardiac resuscitation skills and their perceptions of IP collaboration.
Results: Despite a consistent positive trend, only one out of 17 quantitative survey items were significantly improved for learners in the new curriculum. They were more likely to report feeling confident managing the airway during cardiac resuscitation (P = 0.001). Overall, quantitative results suggest that senior nursing and medical students were comfortable with IP communication and teamwork and confident with cardiac resuscitation skills. There were no significant differences between nursing students’ and medical students’ results. Through qualitative feedback, participants reported feeling comfortable learning with students from other professions and found value in the IP simulation sessions.
Conclusion: Results from this study will inform ongoing restructuring of the IP cardiac resuscitation skills simulation module as defined by the action research process. Specific improvements that are suggested by these findings include strengthening the team leader component of the resuscitation skills lab and identifying learners who may benefit from additional practice in the role of team leader and with other skills where they lack confidence.

Keywords: interprofessional education, undergraduate education, medical education, nursing education, simulation

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