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Effects of an antimicrobial restriction system on appropriate carbapenem use in a hospital without infectious diseases consultation

Authors Wanla W, Katip W, Supakul S, Apiwatnakorn P, Khamsarn S

Received 29 June 2017

Accepted for publication 3 October 2017

Published 28 November 2017 Volume 2017:10 Pages 443—449

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S145133

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Warangkhana Wanla,1 Wasan Katip,2,3 Sakon Supakul,2 Porntipa Apiwatnakorn,4 Sompong Khamsarn1

1Department of Pharmacy, Lamphun Hospital, Lamphun, Thailand; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Care, Faculty of Pharmacy, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 3Pharmaceutical Care Training Center (PCTC), Faculty of Pharmacy, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Lamphun Hospital, Thailand

Background: Gram-negative bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to carbapenems and are related to the use of carbapenems. Thus, the main objective of this study was to compare the appropriateness of prescribing carbapenem before and after using an antimicrobial restriction system without infectious diseases consultation.
Materials and methods: A retrospective cross-sectional before and after study was conducted in Lamphun Hospital to limit the prescription of carbapenems. Data were obtained by a review of the medical records and electronic databases from the period September 2014 to January 2015 (before) and from September 2015 to January 2016 (after).
Results: A total of 360 antibacterial prescriptions were analyzed. The appropriateness of prescribing was higher after using the antimicrobial restriction (55.0%) than before using the antimicrobial restriction system (38.3%; p=0.001). The amount of carbapenem in the defined daily dose per 1,000 bed days increased by 3.48% after using the antimicrobial restriction system when compared with before using the antimicrobial restriction system, which was not statistically significant (p=0.611). The incidence rates of nosocomial infections caused by resistance of Enterobacteriaceae to ertapenem before and after the intervention to limit antimicrobial therapy was found to have decreased from 4.80 to 0.95 infections per 1,000 patient days, respectively (p=1.00). The expenditure for carbapenems in the average value of baht per patient was found to have decreased by 36.33% after using the antimicrobial restriction system when compared with before using the antimicrobial restriction system (p=0.001).
Conclusion: These results suggest that antimicrobial restriction systems can increase the appropriateness of prescribing antibiotics. The expenditure for carbapenem was found to decrease after using the antimicrobial restriction system when compared with before using the antimicrobial restriction system, even without infectious diseases consultation. However, the amount of carbapenem in the defined daily dose per 1,000 bed days was not found to reduce after using the antimicrobial restriction system.

Keywords: antimicrobial restriction system, appropriate prescribing, carbapenem use, DDD

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