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Diversity of respiratory impedance based on quantitative computed tomography in patients with COPD

Authors Wada Y, Kitaguchi Y, Yasuo M, Ueno F, Kawakami S, Fukushima K, Fujimoto K, Hanaoka M

Received 21 January 2018

Accepted for publication 18 March 2018

Published 5 June 2018 Volume 2018:13 Pages 1841—1849

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S163129

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Charles Downs

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Richard Russell


Yosuke Wada,1 Yoshiaki Kitaguchi,1 Masanori Yasuo,1 Fumika Ueno,1 Satoshi Kawakami,2 Kiyoyasu Fukushima,3 Keisaku Fujimoto,4 Masayuki Hanaoka1

1First Department of Internal Medicine, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan; 2Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan; 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Japanese Red Cross Nagasaki Genbaku Isahaya Hospital, Isahaya, Nagasaki, Japan; 4Departments of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Shinshu University School of Health Sciences, Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan

Introduction: This study was conducted in order to investigate the diversity of respiratory physiology, including the respiratory impedance and reversibility of airway obstruction, based on quantitative computed tomography (CT) in patients with COPD.
Patients and methods: Medical records of 174 stable COPD patients were retrospectively reviewed to obtain the patients’ clinical data, including the pulmonary function and imaging data. According to the software-based quantification of the degree of emphysema and airway wall thickness, the patients were classified into the “normal by CT” phenotype, the airway-dominant phenotype, the emphysema-dominant phenotype, and the mixed phenotype. The pulmonary function, including the respiratory impedance evaluated by using the forced oscillation technique (FOT) and the reversibility of airway obstruction in response to inhaled short-acting β2-agonists, was then compared among the four phenotypes.
Results: The respiratory system resistance at 5 and 20 Hz (R5 and R20) was significantly higher, and the respiratory system reactance at 5 Hz (X5) was significantly more negative in the airway-dominant and mixed phenotypes than in the other phenotypes. The within-breath changes of X5 (ΔX5) were significantly greater in the mixed phenotype than in the “normal by CT” and emphysema-dominant phenotypes. The FOT parameters (R5, R20, and X5) were significantly correlated with indices of the degree of airway wall thickness and significantly but weakly correlated with the reversibility of airway obstruction. There was no significant correlation between the FOT parameters (R5, R20, and X5) and the degree of emphysema.
Conclusion: There is a diversity of respiratory physiology, including the respiratory impedance and reversibility of airway obstruction, based on quantitative CT in patients with COPD. The FOT measurements may reflect the degree of airway disease and aid in detecting airway remodeling in patients with COPD.

Keywords:
FOT, respiratory impedance, MostGraph, AWT-Pi10

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