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Determinants of Delayed Treatment-Seeking for Childhood Diarrheal Diseases in Southwest Ethiopia: A Case–Control Study

Authors Asefa A, Qanche Q, Asaye Z, Abebe L

Received 11 April 2020

Accepted for publication 1 June 2020

Published 10 June 2020 Volume 2020:11 Pages 171—178

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PHMT.S257804

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Professor Roosy Aulakh


Adane Asefa,1 Qaro Qanche,1 Zufan Asaye,2 Lemi Abebe1

1Department of Public Health, College of Health Science, Mizan-Tepi University, Mizan Aman, Ethiopia; 2Department of Statistics, College of Natural Science, Mizan-Tepi University, Tepi, Ethiopia

Correspondence: Adane Asefa
Department of Public Health, College of Health Science, Mizan-Tepi University, Mizan-Aman, Ethiopia
Email adane779@gmail.com

Background: Although there are low cost and effective interventions to prevent and treat diarrhea, it is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among under-five children in developing countries. Deaths from diarrheal diseases are largely due to lack of prompt seeking of medical care. This study aimed to identify determinants of delayed treatment-seeking for diarrheal diseases among under-five children in Southwest Ethiopia.
Methods: Unmatched case–control study was conducted among 324 under-five children paired with their mothers/caregivers from 1st April to 30th May 2019. Cases were under-five children paired with their mothers/caregivers who sought treatment after 24 hours of the onset of signs and symptoms of diarrheal diseases, and controls were under-five children paired their mothers/caregivers who sought treatment within 24 hours of the onset of signs and symptoms of diarrheal diseases. Consecutive sampling was used, and data were collected through interviews and chart reviews. Multivariable binary logistic regression analysis was performed, and variables with a P-value < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.
Results: A total of 324 (162 cases and 162 controls) under-five children paired with their mothers/caregivers were included in this study. Being rural residents (AOR=1.93, 95% CI: 1.13,3.31), children from households with more than two children (AOR=2.05, 95% CI: 1.15– 3.66), preferring traditional healers for the treatment of diarrhea (AOR= 4.78, 95% CI: 1.74,13.12), not having television or radio for the households (AOR=2.05, 95% CI: 1.11– 3.66), living in more than 10 km from the nearest health facility (AOR=4.80, 95% CI: 2.61– 4.83), and perceiving diarrhea can cure without treatment (AOR=2.11, 95% CI: 1.15– 3.87) were significant determinants of delayed treatment-seeking.
Conclusion: Being rural residents, larger family size, physical inaccessibility of health facilities, not having access to electronic media (television or radio), preferring traditional healers for the treatment of diarrhea, and having the perception that diarrhea can be cured without treatment were determinants of delayed treatment-seeking for diarrheal diseases among under-five children. Thus, multidimensional approaches that can address accessibility of health facilities and improve caregivers’ awareness are necessary to encourage prompt treatment-seeking for diarrheal diseases among under-five children.

Keywords: delay, treatment-seeking, medical care, diarrhea, case-control

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