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Clinical role of dual bronchodilation with an indacaterol–glycopyrronium combination in the management of COPD: its impact on patient-related outcomes and quality of life

Authors Rossi A, Zanardi E, Poletti V, Cazzola M

Received 24 September 2014

Accepted for publication 22 April 2015

Published 23 July 2015 Volume 2015:10(1) Pages 1383—1392

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S55488

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 5

Editor who approved publication: Dr Richard Russell


Andrea Rossi,1 Erika Zanardi,2 Venerino Poletti,3 Mario Cazzola4

1Pulmonary Unit, University of Verona, Verona, 2Department of Respiratory and General Rehabilitation, ULSS 20, Verona, 3Pulmonary Unit, GB Morgani Hospital, AUSL 20, Forli, 4Pulmonary Unit, University of Rome, Tor Vergata, Italy

Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the result of persistent and progressive pathologic abnormalities in the small airways, most often associated with alveolar loss. Smoking cessation is the most effective intervention to slow down the progression of COPD. Long-acting inhaled bronchodilators are prescribed for the symptomatic relief at any stage of disease severity. For patients whose COPD cannot be not sufficiently controlled with long-acting bronchodilator monotherapy, international guidelines suggest the possibility of associating a long-acting beta2 agonist (LABA) with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA), ie, dual bronchodilation. This is not a new concept as the combination of short-acting agents has been popular in the past. In recent years, several fixed-dose combinations containing a LAMA and a LABA in a single inhaler have been approved by regulatory authorities in several countries. Among the new LAMA/LABA combinations, the fixed-dose combination of indacaterol 110 µg/glycopyrronium 50 µg (QVA149) has been shown in a series of clinical trials to be as safe as the single components and placebo, and more effective than placebo and the single components with regard to lung function, symptoms, and patient-oriented outcomes. Furthermore, QVA149 achieved better bronchodilation than salmeterol 50 µg/fluticasone 500 µg twice daily. Compared with tiotropium, a well-recognized treatment for COPD, the percentage of patients that exceed the minimal clinical important difference for dyspnea and health-related quality of life measurements was superior with QVA149. Other patient-oriented outcomes, such as daily symptoms, night-time awakening, and use of rescue medication consistently favored QVA149. Finally, QVA149 was significantly superior to LAMAs for reducing all types of exacerbation. In conclusion, several years after introduction of dual bronchodilation, the fixed-dose combination of indacaterol 110 µg/glycopyrronium 50 µg in a single inhaler for once-daily administration via the Breezhaler® device (QVA149) has been demonstrated to be a safe and effective treatment for COPD patients.

Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, long-acting bronchodilators, dual bronchodilation, indacaterol, glycopyrronium, patient-oriented outcomes

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