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Chronic cough as a novel phenotype of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Authors Koo HK, Park SW, Park JW, Choi HS, Kim TH, Yoon HK, Yoo KH, Jung KS, Kim DK

Received 11 October 2017

Accepted for publication 29 January 2018

Published 30 May 2018 Volume 2018:13 Pages 1793—1801

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S153821

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Charles Downs

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Richard Russell


Hyeon-Kyoung Koo,1 Sung-Woo Park,2 Jeong-Woong Park,3 Hye Sook Choi,4 Tae-Hyung Kim,5 Hyoung Kyu Yoon,6 Kwang Ha Yoo,7 Ki-Suck Jung,8 Deog Kyeom Kim9

1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Ilsan, Republic of Korea; 2Division of Allergy and Respiratory Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Soon Chun Hyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Republic of Korea; 3Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Gachon University, Gil Medical Center, Incheon, Republic of Korea; 4Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 5Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri, Republic of Korea; 6Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Yeouido St Mary’s Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 7Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 8Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Republic of Korea; 9Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Background and purpose: Chronic cough can be a dominant symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), although its clinical impact remains unclear. The aim of our study was to identify phenotypic differences according to the presence of chronic cough or sputum and evaluate the impact of chronic cough on the risk of acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD).
Methods: In a nationwide COPD cohort including 1,613 COPD patients, patients with chronic cough only, those with sputum only, those with chronic bronchitis (CB), and those without cough and sputum were compared with regard to dyspnea, lung function, quality of life (QoL), and risk of AECOPD.
Results: The rates of chronic cough, chronic sputum, and both were 23.4%, 32.4%, and 18.2%, respectively. Compared with patients without chronic cough, those with chronic cough exhibited a lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second (% predicted) and diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (% predicted), more frequent AECOPD, more severe dyspnea, and worse QoL. Pulmonary function, dyspnea severity, and QoL worsened in the following order: without cough or sputum, with sputum only, with cough only, and with CB. Multivariate analyses revealed chronic cough as an independent risk factor for a lower lung function, more severe dyspnea, and a poor QoL. Moreover, the risk of future AECOPD was significantly associated with chronic cough (odds ratio 1.56, 95% CI 1.08–2.24), but not with chronic sputum.
Conclusion: Our results suggest that chronic cough should be considered as an important phenotype during the determination of high-risk groups of COPD patients.

Keywords:
pulmonary disease, chronic obstructive, cough, exacerbation, severity

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