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Changes in High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels in Relation to Coffee Consumption Among Taiwanese Adults

Authors Chang HC, Nfor ON, Ho CC, Chen PH, Kung YY, Hsu SY, Tantoh DM, Liaw YC, Hsieh CF, Liaw YP

Received 10 August 2020

Accepted for publication 29 September 2020

Published 2 November 2020 Volume 2020:13 Pages 1427—1432

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S276395

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Huan-Cheng Chang,1,2 Oswald Ndi Nfor,3 Chien-Chang Ho,4,5 Pei-Hsin Chen,3 Ya-Yu Kung,6 Shu-Yi Hsu,3 Disline Manli Tantoh,3,7 Yi-Ching Liaw,8 Chuan-Fa Hsieh,9,10 Yung-Po Liaw3,7

1Division of Family Medicine, Department of Community Medicine, Landseed International Hospital, Taoyuan City 324, Taiwan; 2Department of Health Business Management Administration, Hungkuang University, Taichung City 43302, Taiwan; 3Department of Public Health and Institute of Public Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 40201, Taiwan; 4Department of Physical Education, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei 24205, Taiwan; 5Research and Development Center for Physical Education, Health, and Information Technology, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei 24205, Taiwan; 6Division of Health Management, Landseed International Hospital, Taoyuan City 324, Taiwan; 7Department of Medical Imaging, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City 40201, Taiwan; 8Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 9Department of Medical Education, Research & Quality Management, Landseed International Hospital, Taoyuan City 324, Taiwan; 10College of Health Sciences & Technology, National Central University, Taoyuan City 32001, Taiwan

Correspondence: Yung-Po Liaw
Department of Public Health and Institute of Public Health, Chung Shan Medical University, No. 110, Sec. 1 Jianguo N. Road, Taichung City 40201, Taiwan
Tel +886-4-24730022 ext.11838
Fax +886-4-23248179
Email Liawyp@csmu.edu.tw
Chuan-Fa Hsieh
Department of Medical Education, Research & Quality Management, Landseed International Hospital, No. 77, Guangtai Road, Pingzhen City, Taoyuan, Taiwan
Tel +886-3-4941234 ext. 2172
Fax +886-3-20641333-4246
Email hsiehcf@landseed.com.tw

Purpose: High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is essential for cardiometabolic health. Coffee consumption influences the body’s ability to regulate serum lipid profile. Although there is extensive information on coffee and cholesterol, not much is known whether changes in HDL-C concentrations are affected by coffee with or without flavoring substances.
Materials and Methods: Using historical data collected from 1272 participants in Li-Shin (Landseed) International Hospital in Northern Taiwan, we examined the relationship between HDL-C and consumption of plain black coffee with and without additives. Data on coffee consumption between 2006 and 2019 were collected based on self-reported questionnaires while HDL-C measurements were obtained from the electronic medical records of the hospital. t-test, chi-square test and multivariate linear regression analysis were used for analysis.
Results: In our primary analysis, we found that coffee consumption of ≥ 5 cups per week was positively associated with HDL-C (β = 1.9586, p=0.0442) compared with the lowest level (< 1 cup/week) of consumption. We found in a separate model that higher (≥ 5 cups/week) or lower (1– 4 cups/week) consumption of plain black coffee without additives was associated with higher HDL-C. The corresponding β values were 4.0674 (p = 0.0007) and 4.1253 (p = 0.0008), respectively. However, HDL-C levels were not affected by coffee with additives.
Conclusion: We found that consumption of black coffee without additives was associated with higher concentrations of HDL-C among Taiwanese adults over the age of 30. However, HDL-C levels did not change significantly among individuals who consumed black coffee with additives.

Keywords: coffee, cardiometabolic health, caffeine, lipid

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