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CD5-negative chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma in a patient with gastrointestinal mantle cell lymphoma: an unusual case report

Authors Chen D, Zhan Y, Peng J, Yao F

Received 1 November 2018

Accepted for publication 12 March 2019

Published 17 April 2019 Volume 2019:12 Pages 2937—2941

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OTT.S193014

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Cristina Weinberg

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Takuya Aoki


Dangui Chen,1 Yang Zhan,1 Jun Peng,2 Fusheng Yao1

1Department of Hematology, Anqing Municipal Hospital, Anqing Hospital Affiliated to Anhui Medical University, Anqing, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pathology, Anqing Municipal Hospital, Anqing Hospital Affiliated to Anhui Medical University, Anqing, People’s Republic of China

Abstract: Richter’s syndrome, the development of high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), may be triggered by viral infections (eg, Epstein–Barr virus infection). Herein, we report an unusual case of CD5-negative CLL/SLL patient with gastrointestinal mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and hepatitis B virus infection. CLL/SLL was diagnosed based on lymph node immunohistochemistry and bone marrow pathology. This patient was treated with seven cycles of multi-agent chemotherapy. During treatment, the hepatitis B viruses were activated. Then, after 20 months of antiviral treatment with entecavir, he developed abdominal discomfort and abdominal lymphadenopathy and was diagnosed with MCL based on intestinal biopsy. This work indicates that the hepatitis B virus in patients with CLL/SLL may accelerate the progress or transformation to MCL.

Keywords: Richter’s syndrome, chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, hepatitis B virus infection


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