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Are Toll-like receptor gene polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer?

Authors Kutikhin A, Yuzhalin A

Received 30 November 2011

Accepted for publication 13 January 2012

Published 7 February 2012 Volume 2012:4 Pages 23—29

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S28683

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3


Anton G Kutikhin, Arseniy E Yuzhalin
Department of Epidemiology, Kemerovo State Medical Academy, Kemerovo, Russian Federation

Abstract: The suggestion that there is a connection between chronic intraprostatic inflammation and prostate cancer was declared some years ago. As Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the key players in the processes of chronic intraprostatic inflammation, there is a hypothesis that TLR gene polymorphisms may be associated with prostate cancer risk. Although a number of comprehensive studies have been conducted on large samples in various countries, reliable connections between these single nucleotide polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk, stage, grade, aggressiveness, ability to metastasize, and mortality have not been detected. Results have also varied slightly in different populations. The data obtained regarding the absence of connection between the polymorphisms of the genes encoding interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAK1 and IRAK4) and prostate cancer risk might indicate a lack of association between inherited variation in the TLR signaling pathway and prostate cancer risk. It is possible to consider that polymorphisms of genes encoding TLRs and proteins of the TLR pathway also do not play a major role in the etiology and pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Feasibly, it would be better to focus research on associations between TLR single nucleotide polymorphisms and cancer risk in other infection-related cancer types.

Keywords: TLRs, single nucleotide polymorphisms, genetic variation, inflammation, innate immunity

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