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Actin reorganization is involved in vasoactive intestinal peptide induced human mast cells priming to fraktalkine-induced chemotaxis

Authors El-Shazly A

Published 19 August 2008 Volume 2008:1 Pages 27—31

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S3759

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 5


Amr E El-Shazly

Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Liege University Hospital (Centre hospitalier Universaitaire-C.H.U.), Liege, Belgium

Abstract: We recently reported a novel neuro-immuno co-operation between vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and fraktalkine (FKN) in recruiting human mast cells to the asthmatic airway that provided a classical example of priming effect on mast cells migratory function, but the role of the F-actin in human mast cell chemotaxis’ priming is poorly defined. Therefore the aim of this study was to further investigate the biophysical role of the cytoskeletal element; the F-actin, intracellular reorganization and its polymerization in mast cell priming of chemotaxis function. In the present communication it is shown by immunofluoresence confocal microscopy analysis that physical F-actin intracellular reorganization in a membrane bound manner on uman mast cell is involved in VIP-induced priming of human mast cell chemotaxis against FKN. The F-actin reorganization was calcium independent and without modifi cation of its contents as assessed by fluorescence-activated cell scanning analysis. These results identify a novel role for the biophysical association of F-actin in the crosstalk between neuro-inflammatory mediators and mast cells and may be an important target for therapeutic modalities in allergic inflammation.

Keywords: mast cells, chemotaxis, neuroimmuno-axis, F-actin intracellular reorganization, VIP, priming

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