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A feasibility study of NIR fluorescent image-guided surgery in head and neck cancer based on the assessment of optimum surgical time as revealed through dynamic imaging

Authors Yokoyama J, Fujimaki M, Ohba S, Anzai T, Yoshii R, Ito S, Kojima M, Ikeda K

Received 22 December 2012

Accepted for publication 20 February 2013

Published 8 April 2013 Volume 2013:6 Pages 325—330

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OTT.S42006

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3


Junkichi Yokoyama,* Mitsuhisa Fujimaki,* Shinichi Ohba, Takashi Anzai, Ryota Yoshii, Shin Ito, Masataka Kojima, Katsuhisa Ikeda

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan

*These authors contributed equally to this study

Background: In order to minimize surgical stress and preserve organs, endoscopic or robotic surgery is often performed when conducting head and neck surgery. However, it is impossible to physically touch tumors or to observe diffusely invaded deep organs through the procedure of endoscopic or robotic surgery. In order to visualize and safely resect tumors even in these cases, we propose using an indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence method for navigation surgery in head and neck cancer.
Objective: To determine the optimum surgical time for tumor resection after the administration of ICG based on the investigation of dynamic ICG fluorescence imaging.
Methods: Nine patients underwent dynamic ICG fluorescence imaging for 360 minutes, assessing tumor visibility at 10, 30, 60, 120, 180, and 360 minutes. All cases were scored according to near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging visibility scored from 0 to 5.
Results: Dynamic NIR fluorescence imaging under the HyperEye Medical System indicated that the greatest contrast in fluorescent images between tumor and normal tissue could be observed from 30 minutes to 1 hour after the administration of ICG. The optimum surgical time was determined to be between 30 minutes to 2 hours after ICG injection. These findings are particularly useful for detection and safe resection of tumors invading the parapharyngeal space.
Conclusion: ICG fluorescence imaging is effective for the detection of head and neck cancer. Preliminary findings suggest that the optimum timing for surgery is from 30 minutes to 2 hours after the ICG injection.

Keywords: indocyanine green (ICG), navigation surgery, robotic surgery, endoscopic surgery, minimally invasive surgery

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