Back to Journals » Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management » Volume 15

The potential risk factors of cortical visual impairment following cerebral angiography: a retrospective study

Authors Yang Y, Zhang J, Li T

Received 9 May 2019

Accepted for publication 5 July 2019

Published 19 August 2019 Volume 2019:15 Pages 1013—1017

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S215158

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Amy Norman

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Deyun Wang


Yunna Yang,1 Jing Zhang,2 Tong Li3

1Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100043, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100043, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100043, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Yunna Yang
Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 5 Jingyuan Road, Shijingshan, Beijing 100043, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86 105 171 8624
Email yangyyn2015@163.com

Background: Cortical visual impairment is an uncommon complication after cerebral angiography with an incidence of 0.3%-1.0%. Here we would like to investigate and discuss the potential risk factors of cortical visual impairment after cerebral angiography.
Methods: Based on the presence of post-operative cortical visual impairment, 4,528 patients who received cerebral angiography were split into two groups. The relevant risk factors were compared and analyzed between the groups.
Results: In the patient cohort, 11 cases exhibited post-operative cortical visual impairment (0.24%). In particular, seven patients presented with blurred vision and four presented with binocular blindness. Visual sensation of these patients recovered after the treatment. Our univariate analysis revealed that differences in age, weight, sex ratios, proportions of patients with hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipemia, and operation time were not statistically significant between the two groups (P>0.05). The multivariate analysis indicated that the dosage of contrast medium was the independent risk factor for post-operative cortical visual impairment.
Conclusion: Clinically, cortical visual impairment following cerebral angiography typically presented as blurred vision or complete blindness. We have identified the dosage of contrast medium as the most critical independent risk factor based on our study. Preventive strategies need to be implemented to avoid post-operative cortical visual impairment in this regard.

Keywords: cortical blindness, angiography, contrast agent

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]