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The impact of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy with hepatitis B virus infection on perinatal outcomes

Authors Hu Y, Ding Y, Yu L

Received 29 January 2014

Accepted for publication 25 March 2014

Published 23 May 2014 Volume 2014:10 Pages 381—385

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S61530

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

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Yun Hu, Yi-Ling Ding, Ling Yu

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province, People's Republic of China

Introduction: To investigate the impact of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection on perinatal outcomes.
Methods: In the study, 200 pregnant women were divided into four groups, including 50 cases with ICP and HBV infection, 50 cases with ICP, 50 cases with HBV infection, and 50 healthy pregnancies. The delivery process and perinatal outcomes were analyzed among different groups.
Results: When compared to the healthy pregnancy group, significantly increased rates of premature rupture of membranes, meconium-stained amniotic fluid, and cesarean section were observed in cases of ICP, HBV infection, or ICP patients with HBV (P<0.05). Specifically, the rates of HBV infection in the newborn, fetal distress, neonatal asphyxia, and birth defects in the newborn, and infant Apgar scores were higher in ICP pregnancies with HBV (56%, 48%, 16%, and 48%, respectively) than in the other groups (P<0.05).
Conclusion: ICP combined with HBV infection has a clear influence on perinatal infant outcomes.

Keywords: premature rupture of membranes, meconium-stained amniotic fluid, cesarean section, fetal distress, neonatal asphyxia, birth defects, Apgar scores


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