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The effect of long-term use of intranasal steroids on intraocular pressure

Authors Simsek A, Bayraktar C, Dogan S, Karatas M, Sarıkaya Y

Received 14 February 2016

Accepted for publication 14 April 2016

Published 10 June 2016 Volume 2016:10 Pages 1079—1082

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S106392

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Lucy Goodman

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Ali Şimşek,1 Cem Bayraktar,2 Sedat Doğan,2 Mehmet Karataş,2 Yasin Sarıkaya2

1Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Adıyaman University Research and Education Hospital, Adıyaman, Turkey

Abstract: Long-term use of topical nasal steroids (especially older generation steroids) has been shown to elevate intraocular pressure (IOP), but newer intranasal steroids are thought to have a minimal effect on IOP because of their low bioavailability. This study aimed to investigate alterations in IOP with two commonly used intranasal steroids for a 6-month period of time. One-hundred allergic rhinitis patients, divided equally into two groups, used mometasone furoate and fluticasone furoate intranasal steroids for 6 months. IOPs were measured before treatment and repeated at the 3rd, 6th, 12th, and 24th weeks of treatment. The IOPs of the groups were then compared. No statistically significant alteration was observed between the groups during the treatment time period. It was found that new generation intranasal steroids can be used safely, and there may not be an increased risk of IOP elevation in prolonged use in normal healthy people.

Keywords: intraocular pressure, nasal steroids, prolonged use, allergic rhinitis

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