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Target-controlled infusion and population pharmacokinetics of landiolol hydrochloride in patients with peripheral arterial disease

Authors Kunisawa T, Yamagishi A, Suno M, Nakade S, Honda N, Kurosawa A, Sugawara A, Tasaki Y, Iwasaki H

Received 24 September 2014

Accepted for publication 13 October 2014

Published 17 January 2015 Volume 2015:11 Pages 107—114

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S74867

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Garry Walsh

Takayuki Kunisawa,1 Akio Yamagishi,2 Manabu Suno,3 Susumu Nakade,4 Naoki Honda,4 Atsushi Kurosawa,2 Ami Sugawara,2 Yoshikazu Tasaki,5 Hiroshi Iwasaki2

1Surgical Operation Department, Asahikawa Medical University Hospital, Asahikawa, Japan; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Japan; 3Department of Oncology Pharmaceutical Care and Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan; 4Pharmacokinetic Research Laboratories, Ono Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan; 5Department of Hospital Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Japan

Purpose: We previously determined the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of landiolol in healthy male volunteers and gynecological patients. In this study, we determined the PK parameters of landiolol in patients with peripheral arterial disease.
Methods: Eight patients scheduled to undergo peripheral arterial surgery were enrolled in the study. After inducing anesthesia, landiolol hydrochloride was administered at target plasma concentrations of 500 and 1,000 ng/mL for 30 minutes each. A total of 112 data points of plasma concentration were collected from the patients and used for the population PK analysis. A population PK model was developed using a nonlinear mixed-effect modeling software program (NONMEM).
Results: The patients had markedly decreased heart rates at 2 minutes after initiation of landiolol hydrochloride administration; however, systolic blood pressures were lower than the baseline values at only five time points. The concentration time course of landiolol was best described by a two-compartment model with lag time. The estimates of PK parameters were as follows: total body clearance, 30.7 mL/min/kg; distribution volume of the central compartment, 65.0 mL/kg; intercompartmental clearance, 48.3 mL/min/kg; distribution volume of the peripheral compartment, 54.4 mL/kg; and lag time, 0.633 minutes. The predictive performance of this model was better than that of the previous model.
Conclusion: The PK parameters of landiolol were best described by a two-compartment model with lag time. Distribution volume of the central compartment and total body clearance of landiolol in patients with peripheral arterial disease were approximately 64% and 84% of those in healthy volunteers, respectively.

Keywords: landiolol hydrochloride, pharmacokinetics, target-controlled infusion, peripheral arterial disease, TCI, pharmacokinetic parameters, PAD

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