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Strengthening Primary Health-Care Services to Help Prevent and Control Long-Term (Chronic) Non-Communicable Diseases in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

Authors Haque M, Islam T, Rahman NAA, McKimm J, Abdullah A, Dhingra S

Received 18 November 2019

Accepted for publication 24 March 2020

Published 18 May 2020 Volume 2020:13 Pages 409—426

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/RMHP.S239074

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Marco Carotenuto


Video abstract of "Primary Health Care to Prevent and Control Chronic NCDs" [ID 239074]

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Mainul Haque,1 Tariqul Islam,2 Nor Azlina A Rahman,3 Judy McKimm,4 Adnan Abdullah,5 Sameer Dhingra6

1Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia, (National Defence University of Malaysia), Kuala Lumpur 57000, Malaysia; 2UChicago Research Bangladesh, Dhaka 1230, Bangladesh; 3Department of Physical Rehabilitation Sciences, Kulliyyah of Allied Health Sciences, International Islamic University Malaysia, Kuantan, 25200, Malaysia; 4Swansea University School of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea, Wales SA2 8PP, UK; 5Unit of Occupational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia, (National Defence University of Malaysia), Kuala Lumpur 57000, Malaysia; 6School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine Campus, Mount Hope, Trinidad & Tobago

Correspondence: Mainul Haque
Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia, (National Defence University of Malaysia), Kem Perdana Sungai Besi, Kuala Lumpur 57000, Malaysia
Tel +60 1092 65543
Email runurono@gmail.com

Abstract: The prevalence of long-term (chronic) non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is increasing globally due to an ageing global population, urbanization, changes in lifestyles, and inequitable access to healthcare. Although previously more common in high- and upper-middle-income countries, lower-middle-income countries (LMICs) are more affected, with NCDs in LMICs currently accounting for 85– 90% of premature deaths among 30– 69 years old. NCDs have both high morbidity and mortality and high treatment costs, not only for the diseases themselves but also for their complications. Primary health care (PHC) services are a vital component in the prevention and control of long-term NCDs, particularly in LMICs, where the health infrastructure and hospital services may be under strain. Drawing from published studies, this review analyses how PHC services can be utilized and strengthened to help prevent and control long-term NCDs in LMICs. The review finds that a PHC service approach, which deals with health in a comprehensive way, including the promotion, prevention, and control of diseases, can be useful in both high and low resource settings. Further, a PHC based approach also provides opportunities for communities to better access appropriate healthcare, which ensures more significant equity, efficiency, effectiveness, safety, and timeliness, empowers service users, and helps healthcare providers to achieve better health outcomes at lower costs.

Keywords: primary health care, PHC, prevention, control, chronic, long-term conditions, non-communicable diseases, NCDs, lower-middle-income countries, LMICs

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