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Spontaneous resolution of subfoveal perfluorocarbon

Authors Oellers P, Charkoudian L, Hahn P

Received 1 February 2015

Accepted for publication 17 February 2015

Published 19 March 2015 Volume 2015:9 Pages 517—519

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S82019

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Patrick Oellers,1 Leon D Charkoudian,2 Paul Hahn1

1Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Cape Fear Retinal Associates, Wilmington, NC, USA
 
Abstract: Perfluorocarbon liquids (PFCL) have transformed the surgical approach to complex retinal detachments, but their use can be complicated by subretinal retention. Migration of peripherally located subretinal PFCL towards the fovea is well established, but spontaneous resolution of subfoveal PFCL without surgical evacuation or displacement has rarely been described. We present a case of a large single retained subfoveal PFCL droplet following vitrectomy with membrane peeling, inferior relaxing retinectomy, and silicone oil tamponade that demonstrated spontaneous resolution 3 weeks postoperatively, with subsequent anatomic and visual improvement. No residual subretinal PFCL was noted, and we hypothesize that the PFCL droplet spontaneously extruded through a transient hole created in the thinned retina overlying the droplet, which subsequently closed spontaneously. Further understanding of the mechanisms of PFCL migration and resolution may facilitate improved treatments for this complication.

Keywords: perfluorocarbon, subretinal, retained, resolution

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